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    Convict records return to UK

    Hi all, are there and records for convicts returning to the UK? Trying to trace a 5th great grandfather with a possible death in 1941 in Cornwall but wondered if he even came back!?

    EDIT: there is a death in 1841 coming up on Ancestry but I don't have WW sub to see it

    Thanks

    #2
    Convicts rarely returned to the UK. It was quite expensive for fares and could take 6 mths. People did manage though, sometimes after becoming successful.

    Comment


      #3
      If you throw us a name and what you know I'll have a look for you.
      Julie
      They're coming to take me away haha hee hee..........

      .......I find dead people

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by kylejustin View Post
        Convicts rarely returned to the UK. It was quite expensive for fares and could take 6 mths. People did manage though, sometimes after becoming successful.
        I'm very interested in this topic and would appreciate any hints on possible data sets/places to look for info on convicts transported "beyond the seas" and who managed to return home at the end of their sentence.

        Ann Colman, the sister in law of my 3xgt grandfather, was transported to Australia in 1809 and returned in 1817. She was a married woman and the mother of two young girls. Her crime was larceny. 3xgt gdfather was lodging with Ann at the time (his brother Philip was in the navy and away at sea) and he was sentenced to transportation too for the same crimes, but local farmers petitioned on his behalf, saying he'd been led astray by an older woman, and his sentence was commuted to servitude on the Thames hulks, from which he was released after 6 years.

        I was surprised to discover that Ann returned and have often wondered where the money for her journey came from. I THINK there was a site freebie granting a brief period of worldwide research during the lockdown in March 2020 - I have an image I could access and download at that time, but was so excited that I forgot to annotate the source
        Janet in Yorkshire



        Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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          #5
          I've just found another image - my convict was one of nine women returning to England on that ship and they were "to be victualled at the expense of the Crown." I know what that means, but can anyone elucidate WHY???
          Janet in Yorkshire



          Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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            #6
            When I was looking for someone on here, there were records attached to the goal records where they had written and petitioned for release, so some of it maybe luck, even a newspaper report.

            This website has all sorts of records digitised, I found my man and his record of his time there.
            https://foundersandsurvivors.com/

            Like Darksecretz says - put some details up and happy to search around
            Carolyn
            Family Tree site

            Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
            Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Janet in Yorkshire View Post
              I've just found another image - my convict was one of nine women returning to England on that ship and they were "to be victualled at the expense of the Crown." I know what that means, but can anyone elucidate WHY???
              There's this on Trove: https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/a...0for%20England

              Comment


                #8
                Thank you Teasie. That's a GREAT find. Seems that Lady Luck dealt Ann a good hand!
                I tracked down her two daughters in Norwich, where they married in 1826 & 1827. There is a Norwich burial for an Ann Colman of the appropriate age in 1827. Ann may have had a brother who lived in Norwich, so perhaps she went to him on her return to England. Ann's brother in law (my ancestor) married in his home village in 1816 and, at the baptism of their first child later that year, the vicar recorded the name of the mother as Ann rather than Elizabeth. That conundrum puzzled me for 30+ years, until I learned of his criminal record and, subsequently, of his connection with his sister in law Ann. Ann left NSW in 1817 but the story of her and the two brothers must have created quite a stir, causing the vicar to make a Freudian slip when filling in the baptism register.
                Janet in Yorkshire



                Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

                Comment


                  #9
                  Janet in Yorkshire you had a thread last year in here with lots of links for Ann, not sure if one of those maybe takes you to your missing source https://www.familytreeforum.com/foru...lman-nee-lever
                  Carolyn
                  Family Tree site

                  Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                  Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Bless you, Carolyn, I'd forgotten about that thread
                    It matches perfectly with all the sources I'd stored away on the family history section of my PC! Will re-read the thread and then write up a word doc resume to summarise and collate all the docs I've saved in the Philip and Ann file. I think I must have got carried away by all the findings, downloaded images, but then forgot to write up an account of Ann's life, based on the new info.

                    I hope tessie's query in the opening post brings her the help and results that my request brought me.

                    Thanks again cbcarolyn
                    Jay
                    Janet in Yorkshire



                    Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Darksecretz View Post
                      If you throw us a name and what you know I'll have a look for you.
                      Sorry about replying so long after the post - got waylaid and I don't get notifications to my email to say someone has replied like I used to!!

                      Anyway, if anyone is still interested details are:

                      William Burnett b.1804, date of trial 28th June 1836, Hampshire. The record I can sort of see says he was transported on 'Mangles' and arrived in NSW 9 Jul 1937.

                      Thanks

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by tessie31082 View Post

                        Sorry about replying so long after the post - got waylaid and I don't get notifications to my email to say someone has replied like I used to!!


                        Thanks
                        you need to go to user settings on drop down in top right hand corner, and then select notifications, and you can set it to have replies to your posts, you can also hit the subscribe button at the top of a thread on right.

                        Carolyn
                        Family Tree site

                        Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                        Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                        Comment


                          #13
                          If he stayed in Australia then you might be able to find him on the death indexes or in the newspapers, but its a common name so that's likely to be difficult..

                          I can see he obtained his ticket of leave in 1841 and was allowed to remain in the district of Goulburn.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Also bear in mind australia is vast, and unchartered for the early 19th century. Not all events are registered. I have plenty of ancestors not registering births in the 1850's, after civil reg was introduced. And people weren't always buried in churchyards at that time. Some were buried on properties. He didn't necessarily stay in nsw either.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by teasie View Post
                              If he stayed in Australia then you might be able to find him on the death indexes or in the newspapers, but its a common name so that's likely to be difficult..

                              I can see he obtained his ticket of leave in 1841 and was allowed to remain in the district of Goulburn.
                              Ooh thanks Teasie! Is it worth looking on Trove - is that good for these records?

                              Good to know kylejustin!

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