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    Help with handwriting please

    A good day with new Petty Sessions records for Donegal being added to FMP’s collection - they’re earlier records than were previously included so I’ve managed to find some of my ancestors pre-Griffiths in 1857 and pre-famine!
    Re Andrew McShea v the Pattersons, case number 8 on this page - as well as threatening to burn his house, what did they threaten to do to his cattle? It’s the only word I’m not sure of...
    https://search.findmypast.ie/record?...BALLY%2F038474

    Thanks,
    Christine
    Researching:
    HOEY (Co Fermanagh, other Ulster counties and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) BANNIGAN and FOX (Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland and Portland, Maine, USA) REYNOLDS, McSHEA, PATTERSON and GOAN (Corker and Creevy, Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland) DYER (Belfast and Ballymacarrett) SLEVIN and TIMONEY (Co Fermanagh) BARNETT (Ballagh, Co Tyrone and Strangford, Co Down)

    #2
    this link is co.uk
    https://search.findmypast.co.uk/reco...BALLY%2F038474

    I think it says hough, which a google says

    archaic British
    • Disable (a person or animal) by cutting the hamstrings.
    Carolyn
    Family Tree site

    Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
    Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by cbcarolyn View Post
      this link is co.uk
      https://search.findmypast.co.uk/reco...BALLY%2F038474

      I think it says hough, which a google says

      archaic British
      • Disable (a person or animal) by cutting the hamstrings.
      Thanks Carolyn. I’ve never come across hough as a verb although I come across it previously as a surname or place name - the main shopping street locally is Hough Lane. All pronounced huff in my experience, whereas online pronunciation guides for it as a verb suggest a pronunciation similar to hock.
      In a former life, I used to train literacy/English teachers and remember giving them an activity where they had to identify the nine - yes, nine - different ways the -ough letter string could be pronounced in English.

      Christine
      Researching:
      HOEY (Co Fermanagh, other Ulster counties and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) BANNIGAN and FOX (Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland and Portland, Maine, USA) REYNOLDS, McSHEA, PATTERSON and GOAN (Corker and Creevy, Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland) DYER (Belfast and Ballymacarrett) SLEVIN and TIMONEY (Co Fermanagh) BARNETT (Ballagh, Co Tyrone and Strangford, Co Down)

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Karamazov View Post

        Thanks Carolyn. I’ve never come across hough as a verb although I come across it previously as a surname or place name - the main shopping street locally is Hough Lane. All pronounced huff in my experience, whereas online pronunciation guides for it as a verb suggest a pronunciation similar to hock.
        In a former life, I used to train literacy/English teachers and remember giving them an activity where they had to identify the nine - yes, nine - different ways the -ough letter string could be pronounced in English.

        Christine
        it is amazing so many ways, I was thinking also when you 'huff' in draughts and cards, now wondering if that is spelt hough
        Carolyn
        Family Tree site

        Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
        Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

        Comment

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