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    #21
    Wow Glen, that is some stories you have uncovered there!!!! the ten foot one must be a record!!!
    My Family History Blog Site:

    https://chiddicksfamilytree.com

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      #22
      Originally posted by Glen in Tinsel Knickers View Post

      Last night I found a chap who had an affair with a married woman, after she returned to her husband he arranged to meet her, they went for a walk, he pulled out a razor and slashed her throat then tried to cut his own. He failed on both counts, 3 years for malicious wounding.
      ooh nasty
      Carolyn
      Family Tree site

      Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
      Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

      Comment


        #23
        Originally posted by Anne in Carlisle View Post
        Carolyn ... I should have mentioned the baby death was in Ampthill in 1868.
        Anne
        aww, feels closer somehow.
        Carolyn
        Family Tree site

        Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
        Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

        Comment


          #24
          Originally posted by ozgirl View Post
          I have a distant cousin from a nice middle-class family who started his life of crime at the age of 19 in 1885 . He was basically a conman with a penchant for forging plus petty theft. Upon his release from his time in prison he was banished to Australia by his family. Once there he came out of his shell and for the rest of his life he was in and out of prison, terms ranging from 3 months to 7 years. He used at least 12 aliases (including a doctor and the son of a baronet) and along the way married 7 times, most of them bigamous. He retired when he reached the age of 70 and spent the remaining 17 years in a home for reformed convicts. He can't have been very good at what he did as he seemed to get caught on a regular basis. I think he spent close on 40 years of his life in total in prison.
          wow proper life of crime ha looks as though he dodged a sentence to VDL!

          How did you find all the info, in the paper?

          Carolyn
          Family Tree site

          Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
          Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

          Comment


            #25
            Gran's grand uncle is in prison for a few census returns, can't find any newspapers to explain why.

            another distant uncle went to prison for watering down his flour with sawdust and other such like.

            my 3rd great grandfather was whispered to be a "remittance man", who, in a fit of rage upon arrival in australia; burned all his papers. I actually think he was a convict, who has the same name, same age and comes from the same town (no trace of this man there though). This bloke was part of a thieving ring operating from london in the midlands in 1833. He was arrested for stealing a ladies things she left behind in her hotel, after she foolishly told him after meeting him on the road. While on trial a local priest identified him as a former servant who had run off with the treasures from the church! He used a few alias'. In tasmania, he has a long record of breaking laws, being whipped and moved around the chain gangs till he got his ticket of leave in 1840. After that, he conveniently vanishes and the first trace of my ancestor is his daughter's birth in 1842 in what is now a suburb of melbourne. I thoroughly believe they are one and the same, and the story about being a remittance man is just so perfect hiding the truth.

            another third great grandfather was sent to australia by his family for some unknown crime in 1842, aged 18. "ploughing his oats in a society damsel" is the family's favourite theory. He was in trouble for selling "sly grog" as a hotelier later in life, according to my grandma. There is a possibility his mother sent him to boarding school in staffordshire, there is a possible hit for him in newspapers as a 15 yo who stole from a lady near the school (jewellry, candle sticks etc). It is a slightly more common name, so who knows?

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              #26
              Also, not my family; there was a sweet, elderly family friend when i was a baby, who was like an aunt to many members of my family. She died when i was little, and my aunt and uncle recently told me she had a sister who was murdered in the 1920's, and she had never known a life free of abuse. She had even unwittingly danced with "squizzy taylor" at a dance once.

              I googled her sister's name, and it was an infamous murder case. One of the earliest child rape and murder cases recorded in melbourne. Her's was a similar case to a more infamous child rape and murder that occurred a year before, and the media linked both cases. The wrong man was executed for the prior murder, and the culprit is now thought to have been the cousin who molested several family members. No one was convicted for the second, though the local pharmacist was suspected as he used to have the kids sit on the counter and gave them sweets. Both cases were highly disturbing.

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                #27
                Originally posted by cbcarolyn View Post



                How did you find all the info, in the paper?
                Most of the info was found by another person researching him who had found out most of the aliases and at that time 5 of the marriages. We then unearthed another couple of marriages and aliases together. There are numerous entries for this person on Trove, plus some fascinating prison records on Ancestry, including photos - all I can assume is that the reprobate had a lot of charm as he didn't have the looks.

                If you are interested in his full list of misdemeanours he can be seen here: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/family-tr...70077790/facts
                Linda


                My avatar is my Grandmother Carolina Meulenhoff 1896 - 1955

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                  #28
                  My Dad's half brother committed bigamy twice (that we are aware of) and got 18 months sentence. Also my maternal grt grandfather got 7 years transportation for forging a signature on a financial document.
                  Cath.

                  Comment


                    #29
                    Originally posted by ozgirl View Post

                    Most of the info was found by another person researching him who had found out most of the aliases and at that time 5 of the marriages. We then unearthed another couple of marriages and aliases together. There are numerous entries for this person on Trove, plus some fascinating prison records on Ancestry, including photos - all I can assume is that the reprobate had a lot of charm as he didn't have the looks.

                    If you are interested in his full list of misdemeanours he can be seen here: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/family-tr...70077790/facts
                    whooooaah that is a long list!
                    Carolyn
                    Family Tree site

                    Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                    Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                    Comment


                      #30
                      Originally posted by Cath RJ View Post
                      My Dad's half brother committed bigamy twice (that we are aware of) and got 18 months sentence. Also my maternal grt grandfather got 7 years transportation for forging a signature on a financial document.
                      it seems such a hefty sentence for something like that.
                      Carolyn
                      Family Tree site

                      Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                      Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                      Comment


                        #31
                        My Grandad was fine 20shillings in WW2. He was walking home from the pub and a policeman had a torch shinning and my Grandad told him to turn it off as there shouldn't be any lights showing and he refused so my Grandad knocked his helmet off.

                        His father was imprisioned a few times, mainly for petty crime and the only photo I have of him is a mug shot. That side of my tree the whole family were petty criminals but by 1900 had reformed.
                        Lin

                        Searching Lowe, Everitt, Hurt and Dunns in Nottingham

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                          #32
                          Off the top of my head. My great grandmothers cousin was murdered for spurning the advances of their lodger. The cousin's father was guilty of embezzling the company he worked for and was found running off with another woman. This helped explain why when the murder was reported in the papers the published given name of the father was his middle name.
                          Another Great Grandmother's cousin was shot and killed by a gamekeeper when out poaching rabbits. He was 12 years old.
                          There are many other examples of poaching incidents with often imprisonment with hard labour as punishment.
                          Numerous cases of bigamy. My Great Grandfather being charged and imprisoned with hard labour for this. Oh and was also imprisoned for going AWOL from the army.

                          Going back to my affluent ancestors there are many incidents of crimes against them, eg poaching, theft of property and stock etc.
                          Bubblebelle x

                          FAMILY INTERESTS: Pitts of Sherborne Gloucs. Deaney (Bucks). Pye of Kent. Randolph of Lydd, Kent. Youell of Norfolk and Suffolk. Howe of Lampton. Carden of Bucks.

                          Comment


                            #33
                            Not quite on the same line but still a crime. John Timms a distant cousin born in 1798 was murdered in 1818 by being thrown in the river Trent. his body was found a few days later at Holme Pierrepont and the Inquest was held at the local pub and due to the state of the body was buried quickly in the local church. Apparently everyone knew who had committed the crime but nothing was done about it. His parents in dispair moved to the Cape Colonies in South Africa approx 1820. His murderers were bought to justice in 1822 and hanged in Nottingham.
                            I had the good fortune a few years ago to meet two of the descendents at Nottm Archives and we spent the day doing research and talking. Most was passed down by word of mouth and they are not sure if his parents ever knew the culprits were caught.
                            Not looked all the dates up so if I'm a year out on some of them I apologise.
                            Lin

                            Searching Lowe, Everitt, Hurt and Dunns in Nottingham

                            Comment


                              #34
                              Some of your families may have been victims of financial crime, great grandad's cousin Beatrice Stevens was married to Thomas Farrow of Farrow's Bank who with his partner was tried for conspiracy to defraud in 1920 after the bank crashed, it had appealed to small savers, with it's high rates of interest, it seems they were more incompetent than dishonest but they were found guilty and jailed. I was able to buy a book on the subject from a Farrow descendant who had self published, it had been a family secret that he uncovered, and I was able to share what I knew of Beatrice & family.

                              At one point Farrow lived in Staplefield, not far from me so I was able to take a look at his house, now split into flats. His wife did not have to bear the shame, she died of diabetes on Christmas Day 1913 and is buried next to the porch at St Mark Staplefield in a double plot, but her husband was not buried there.

                              Comment


                                #35
                                Originally posted by cbcarolyn View Post

                                it seems such a hefty sentence for something like that.
                                Yes it does but I think he had tried it before and he was in a position of trust,
                                Cath.

                                Comment


                                  #36
                                  Originally posted by Lin Fisher View Post
                                  Not quite on the same line but still a crime. John Timms a distant cousin born in 1798 was murdered in 1818 by being thrown in the river Trent. his body was found a few days later at Holme Pierrepont and the Inquest was held at the local pub and due to the state of the body was buried quickly in the local church. Apparently everyone knew who had committed the crime but nothing was done about it. His parents in dispair moved to the Cape Colonies in South Africa approx 1820. His murderers were bought to justice in 1822 and hanged in Nottingham.
                                  I had the good fortune a few years ago to meet two of the descendents at Nottm Archives and we spent the day doing research and talking. Most was passed down by word of mouth and they are not sure if his parents ever knew the culprits were caught.
                                  Not looked all the dates up so if I'm a year out on some of them I apologise.
                                  did you find out the motive for the murder?
                                  Carolyn
                                  Family Tree site

                                  Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                                  Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                                  Comment


                                    #37
                                    Carolyn, I think they were drunk and had an argument, and as they were going over Trent Bridge they decided to perhaps have a fight and it got out of hand. in 1922 one of them was bragging while drunk about doing it and that is how he got arrested.
                                    Lin

                                    Searching Lowe, Everitt, Hurt and Dunns in Nottingham

                                    Comment


                                      #38
                                      https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...murder&f=false

                                      Not sure if this link will work but it's Robert Bamford and Adam Adie.
                                      Lin

                                      Searching Lowe, Everitt, Hurt and Dunns in Nottingham

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