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Thread: Illegitimacy NOT covered up

  1. #11
    The concubine is mine Merry.

    One of my actresses who was shacked up with a politician because she couldn't find her husband in order to divorce him. Henrietta and Henry caused great scandal in London society and I expect they did it as a "two fingers" to the establishment. Or whatever the Victorian equivalent of two fingers is
    Zoe in London

    Cio che Dio vuole, io voglio ~ What God wills, I will

  2. #12
    I've seen one recently in the 1851 census with the Ryder family. David Lyons shown as 'Son', but written above his name is 'illegitimate'. In later census he is listed as David Ryder, 'Son'. Clearly he or they had decided that he should adopt the family name.
    Phil
    historyhouse.co.uk
    Essex - family and local history.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by samesizedfeet View Post
    The concubine is mine Merry.

    Ah yes...............!!

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by samesizedfeet View Post
    Or whatever the Victorian equivalent of two fingers is
    They say that the "two fingers" is left from archers (i.e. 13th, 14th century or so) showing the French that they still had the means to cause trouble. Whether or not that's another busted myth, I don't know... but it sounds plausible.

    Christine
    Researching: BENNETT (Leics/Birmingham-ish) - incl. Leonard BENNETT in Detroit & Florida ; WARR/WOR, STRATFORD & GARDNER/GARNAR (Oxon); CHRISTMAS, RUSSELL, PAFOOT/PAFFORD (Hants); BIGWOOD, HAYLER/HAILOR (Sussex); LANCASTER (Beds, Berks, Wilts) - plus - COCKS (Spitalfields, Liverpool, Plymouth); RUSE/ROWSE, TREMEER, WADLIN(G)/WADLETON (Devonport, E Cornwall); GOULD (S Devon); CHAPMAN, HALL/HOLE, HORN (N Devon); BARRON, SCANTLEBURY (Mevagissey)...

  5. #15
    Member Mark Dudley's Avatar
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    Apparently the French would cut off the first two fingers of a bowman's hand... Hence the signal (as far as I know...)
    Let's re-arrange the deck-chairs

  6. #16
    If you search for "Rachael Chalurcklafte" in 1861 you will see the enumerator has found two concubines in the same street (on the same page! lol). Not in the same house though!!

  7. #17
    Oh, and there are those "Nymphs of the Pavement" somewhere, aren't there!

    Christine

  8. #18

    Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Merry Monty Montgomery View Post
    If you search for "Rachael Chalurcklafte" in 1861 you will see the enumerator has found two concubines in the same street (on the same page! lol). Not in the same house though!!
    Hi, Merry,

    The word concubinage, two unmarried people living together, is not much used in modern English, although it's in the Oxford English Dictionary, but it's still the legal term in Belgium.

    Pete

  9. #19
    I have one in 1851, rather charmingly enumerated as
    "chance child of Ruth".
    (Ruth is the unmarried daughter of head of house.)
    Janet in Yorkshire



    Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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