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    Catholic ban on LDS

    Can someone please tell me how l can get the thread up about the catholic church banning the LDS from filming their records. Thankyou.
    Pam

    #2
    I think I found this on Talkingccot.com

    Hugo

    Comment


      #3
      terrified they'll be baptised elsewhere..........:D

      Comment


        #4
        Here it is:

        http://www.familytreeforum.com/resea...c-records.html

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks a lot Mary x
          Pam

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks Hugo
            Pam

            Comment


              #7
              Following on from that thread people might like to know a few of the following facts for future reference:

              1536 Reformation and the laws of the country restricted RC's from worshipping as they wished.

              1681 Last Catholic was Executed

              1778 Law on Catholic Worship changed and Catholics were then allowed to practice in public.

              1791 Catholics were allowed to vote.

              1829 Catholic Emancipation and Catholics were allowed to become MP's

              Janet

              Comment


                #8
                Janet,

                A gentle amplification.

                "1536 Reformation and the laws of the country restricted RC's from worshipping as they wished."

                The country you refer to is England and the legislation did not apply to Scotland. The Union of Parliaments did not happen until 17107. Having said that, I am ashamed to say that I know so little of my country's history that I am not sure about the position of the Catholic church at that time.

                Hugo

                Comment


                  #9
                  Good point, Hugo. A lot of people don't realise that Scotland had, and still has, different legislation from England in many respects.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Scotland has always been more tolerant of RCs, historically speaking, due to their closeness with France and Ireland.

                    OC

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I had not given much thought to Scottish Catholicism when I wrote the previous but of course we all know the history of Mary Queen of Scots and her troubles with Elizabeth leading to her eventual execution and later James 2 and all his problems but I have found the following and think it is worth putting up here as the Scottish side has been neglected.

                      "500 years of Roman Catholicism, and any semblance of religious tolerance, came to a juddering halt with the Reformation in 1560. In Scotland this took the form of an orgy of destruction driven by an especially radical brand of Presbyterian Protestantism ("Presbyterian" means governed by representative committees rather than by a hierarchy of bishops). It led to the supplanting of the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland by the Presbyterian Kirk; and to the loss of much of the magnificent architecture built during the previous 500 years.

                      If the practice of religion in Scotland in the 1500s was destructive, things only got worse in the 1600s. First, efforts by James VI/I to secure his hold on Ireland resulted in his "Plantation of Ulster" in the early years of the century. Large numbers of Protestants from Scotland were offered land in return for settling in predominantly Catholic Ireland. Many took up the offer. This was to trigger an era of conflict in Ireland that has only very recently reached any sort of resolution.

                      In 1637, efforts by Charles I to impose an Anglican form of Protestantism in Scotland resulted in riots in Edinburgh. They were followed by a national uprising and the signing of the National Covenant by those who wished to retain a Presbyterian form of Protestantism in Scotland. This led directly to war with England over whether bishops should be introduced into the Kirk, which in turn led to the two English Civil Wars, to the occupation by Cromwell of Scotland, and, later in the century, to the "Killing Time", a period in which many Scots were killed because of their support for either the Covenant and radical Presbyterianism on the one hand, or the Crown on the other.

                      The lines of conflict changed when, in 1689, the English Parliament engineered the "Glorious Revolution" in which the Catholic James VII/II was displaced by his Protestant daughter Mary and her husband William of Orange. The Jacobite uprisings in Scotland in 1689, 1715, 1718 and 1745 all involved largely Catholic Highland clans supporting the Jacobites against the largely Protestant Hanoverians, who in turn received large scale support from Protestant Scots."

                      Janet

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Janet

                        Quite right, of course - I should have said "GENERALLY more tolerant, except for..." LOL!

                        OC

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