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    Help with surname origin and meaning

    Looking for The place/country or the meaning of my surname...There is a few of us out there but no-one knows where it comes from or the meaning,all help is appreciated..
    My surname is GUILAR.
    Thank you

    #2
    I've moved your thread to our Research Qs & As forum - hopefully someone will be able to help you.

    Hope you don't mind but have also amended your title so that it shows what sort of help you are looking for.
    Elaine







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      #3
      Jened

      Is it pronounced GWEE-LAR or Guyler please?

      My first thought is Spanish or French and I think it would mean a Tailor. Aguille is French for needle, so French/Spanish etc. Possibly a Huguenot name?

      OC

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        #4
        I THINK it's spanish..........

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          #5
          No probs Elaine..Thanks for your help....
          It,s pronounced Guylar...


          I thought it was French and was in the time of the huganots prodestants) who were kicked out of france by the catholics...But no evidence of this....

          I can see why you would think it was spanish.


          There are a few ways to spell it,but i dont know what spelling came first...
          Guillar....Guiller....Guilor and on and on..

          But thank you all for your help.

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            #6
            I am also wondering if it might have started life as Aguilar which is definitely spanish.

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              #7
              There is a family named Guilar in Liverpool.....1909 is the first signs of them...
              are you far from Liverpool Jen ??.....allan:Wink:(check facebook)
              Allan ......... researching oakes/anyon/standish/collins/hartley/barker/collins-cheshire
              oakes/tipping/ellis/jones/schacht/...garston, liverpool
              adams-shropshire/roberts-welshpool
              merrick/lewis/stringham/nicolls-herefordshire
              coxon/williamson/kay/weaver-glossop/stockport/walker-gorton

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                #8
                It may be a corruption. I looked on the British Library's 19th century newspapers. There is a William Johnson Guilar in Salford in 1876, and references to a Belfast Guiler. Also found references to the Spanish d'Aguilar or Aguilar.
                As there were so few references to each of these it could mean they were typo errors also.:conf:
                Phil
                historyhouse.co.uk
                Essex - family and local history.

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                  #9
                  Hi Jened - The name also appears in Scotland from the Armada and it does seem likely it was probably Aguilar originally. There is a Guilar in the National Archives
                  Detecting your browser settings and only five with that exact spelling in Canada and one in Australia. I also agree that it is possibly a corruption...there are about 20 x different ways that it can be spelt.
                  If you search back as early as you can, that might give clues as well.

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                    #10
                    The earliest Guilar i have found a realation to me is Peter Guilar c1765 i think he came from Dunbar area (east lothian) in scotland and was married to an Agnes Deans.....Very interesting and confusing..
                    Thankyou so much for your help.

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                      #11
                      Name Lab says it is from Old French 'guileor' which would have meant deceiver, wiley person.

                      It would be a variation of the German spelling Geiler.

                      Not counting of course on the possible mistakes in spelling that can have the same spelling as a result, but not necessarily the same root.

                      It seems a little strange to me to have the first letter of a name chopped off, though. Other than that, the French for tailor is 'tailleur' and needle i 'aiguille'.

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                        #12
                        kiki

                        My brain was jumping about when I said "tailor" for aguille - I was thinking of an "aguiller" which was (I suppose) someone who plied a needle, possibly a tailor or maybe some kind of embroiderer??

                        I agree, surnames are very difficult to pin down sometimes because you just don't know what they were originally, and whether they have been phonetically rendered or mistranscribed down the years.

                        It doesn't seem strange to me that the first letter (a vowel) has possibly been dropped from the name, but until you can get this family back by traditional family history searches, then I don't think jened can really reach any conclusions yet.

                        OC

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by kiki1982 View Post
                          Name Lab says it is from Old French 'guileor' which would have meant deceiver, wiley person.

                          It would be a variation of the German spelling Geiler.

                          Not counting of course on the possible mistakes in spelling that can have the same spelling as a result, but not necessarily the same root.

                          It seems a little strange to me to have the first letter of a name chopped off, though. Other than that, the French for tailor is 'tailleur' and needle i 'aiguille'.
                          According to my dictionary (Chambers) Edmund Spenser used Guyler in the sense of deceiver.

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                            #14
                            There is no mention of the verb 'aiguiller' meaning something in connection with a needle. The only thing, remotely metaphorically connected is 'to point'.

                            An 'aiguilleur' is someone responsible for putting trains on the tracks.

                            Aguilar in any case, refers to a knight of Toledo.

                            Pronunciationwise I'd think it very strange that they would miss the first vowel out.

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                              #15
                              THe Old French 'guileor' and the Spenserian 'guyler' are presumably connected in that both use guile to achieve their ends. 'Wile' is etymologically connected. However, at this distance and given the vagaries of spelling it is unlikely that one will be able to pinpoint the origin of the name except to say that at one point it was Scottish.

                              Peter

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                                #16
                                Hi Jened. Just sent you a pm. ;-)

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                                  #17
                                  You guys have been really helpful....Im from Scotland my-self,and as i said Peter Guilar( so many times my grandfather) i think was born in Dunbar area of East Lothian (The Borders)..So far i have,nt found a Guilar that was born in another country.And all the Guilars i have spoken,e-mailed,text dont know where the name originated.......But thanks to you guys i now have atleast somewhewre to start.....Don,t like the deciever bit though...hehehehehe.
                                  Big THANKS to you guys.
                                  Jened

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