Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

wedding certificate details

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    wedding certificate details

    I was trying to offer somebody help with their family as they were convinced they were related to my in -laws but I knew she was on the wrong track so I advised her to order a marriage certificate telling her it would give the bride and grooms fathers and occupations, how wrong was i? She said there is just a line through all that section so no more details other than their ages and that the groom had a marriage dissolved. I would have thought that something would have been put in that section even if it was deceased.

    #2
    I have seen a number of parish certificate books, from the earlier days of registration in particular, where the vicar has not entered the fathers or their occupations for lots of consecutive certificate entries. It is very frustrating.
    Anne

    Comment


      #3
      I feel bad as it was my advice that made her order the certificate. Not sure how she is going to find anything now

      Comment


        #4
        It was proper, solid advice. Not your fault the expected information wasn't recorded.

        Comment


          #5
          If neither of them knew their father's names (illegitimate in other words) then that section would be left blank. I have quite few marriage certs with blanks where the father's name ought to be.

          OC

          Comment


            #6
            I wondered if it would be on his previous marriage or at least have unknown on it.

            Comment


              #7
              Gloryer, I don't think a certificate ever has the word "unknown" on it where the father's name should be as registration doesn't require that. It will be left blank with a line through it.

              You know what I am going to say next, lol - you will only know what was on the first marriage cert if you buy it. One of mine married twice, put two different made up father's names, but those made up names confirmed my research and I am now 99% sure of the identity of his birth father.

              OC

              Comment


                #8
                OC ............

                I have a certificate where it says "illegitimate" where the father's name should be.

                and I have seen a Parish Register entry where a father's name was written in, then crossed out and "unknown" put instead (presumably by the vicar).
                My grandmother, on the beach, South Bay, Scarborough, undated photo (poss. 1929 or 1930)

                Researching Cadd, Schofield, Cottrell in Lancashire, Buckinghamshire; Taylor, Park in Westmorland; Hayhurst in Yorkshire, Westmorland, Lancashire; Hughes, Roberts in Wales.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Sylvia

                  I have Scottish certificates which say "illegitimate" but not English ones. I have also often seen illegitimate in a parish register, but never on an English certificate.

                  OC

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Olde Crone Holden View Post
                    Sylvia

                    I have Scottish certificates which say "illegitimate" but not English ones. I have also often seen illegitimate in a parish register, but never on an English certificate.

                    OC
                    There you go OC. My 2nd Great Grandmother's marriage in 1865. What a nice man that vicar was!! When I got the certificate I wondered at first what it actually said.

                    Emma.JPG
                    Kat
                    My avatar is my Great Grandmother, Cassandra Elizabeth Palmer 1861 to 1940

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Ooh, Kat, someone else has this (illegitimate daughter of mother named) but when we discussed it, we decided the mother had insisted her name was on the certificate! I THINK that if you married in the RO, the registrar would not put that, because it is a father's name asked for, nothing else.

                      You should see some of the things vicars have written in the registers about my relatives! Perhaps they didn't realise we'd all be gawping at them 200 years later.

                      OC

                      Comment


                        #12
                        That’s why I like our Aussie certs. So much more info.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Harrys mum View Post
                          That’s why I like our Aussie certs. So much more info.

                          But is the information always true, or any more true than on English certificates???
                          My grandmother, on the beach, South Bay, Scarborough, undated photo (poss. 1929 or 1930)

                          Researching Cadd, Schofield, Cottrell in Lancashire, Buckinghamshire; Taylor, Park in Westmorland; Hayhurst in Yorkshire, Westmorland, Lancashire; Hughes, Roberts in Wales.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Sylvia C View Post
                            But is the information always true, or any more true than on English certificates???
                            I’ve found most of mine have been true. I’ve got a few who said they married and didn’t, but for actual certs, the only wrong one is my great grandfather’s birth and that was in England.

                            At least marriage certs have both parents, and births have older siblings, and deaths have all the children, although there is always room for errors.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              There’s always room for errors and deliberate misinformation no matter whether it’s B,M or D.
                              I have three Scottish birth certs for children to my gt. grandmother’s sister who gave the same 1896 date and place of marriage on all of them. At least she was a consistent fibber LOL The marriage had never taken place as she was still married to her actual legal husband till 1931 when he died.

                              Comment


                                #16
                                Originally posted by Olde Crone Holden View Post
                                Ooh, Kat, someone else has this (illegitimate daughter of mother named) but when we discussed it, we decided the mother had insisted her name was on the certificate! I THINK that if you married in the RO, the registrar would not put that, because it is a father's name asked for, nothing else.

                                You should see some of the things vicars have written in the registers about my relatives! Perhaps they didn't realise we'd all be gawping at them 200 years later.

                                OC
                                Mine were both minors so I don't think they had much choice in the matter. I suspect the vicar was making an example of them
                                Kat
                                My avatar is my Great Grandmother, Cassandra Elizabeth Palmer 1861 to 1940

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by Harrys mum View Post
                                  I’ve found most of mine have been true. I’ve got a few who said they married and didn’t, but for actual certs, the only wrong one is my great grandfather’s birth and that was in England.

                                  At least marriage certs have both parents, and births have older siblings, and deaths have all the children, although there is always room for errors.

                                  I was thinking more in terms of the names of parents and siblings of children, ages etc, especially ones back in the "old country", wherever that was.

                                  I know that some certificates that I've seen for ancestors of mine who emigrated in the 1840s and 1850s gradually get less and less accurate as the years go by in terms of younger generations being accurate for their parents! And I've had real problems when trying to help others researching ancestors who'd emigrated to Australia and trying to find their parents etc back in the UK.


                                  As far as more recent certificates ............. my own grandfather lied about his age on his marriage certificate (so did his wife), then lied about his birth date on his enrollment in WW1, and then continued to lie for the rest of his life. As a result, his son gave the wrong information on the death certificate, only finding out months later that it was wrong ............... but he didn't tell anyone!

                                  I've since bought all the certificates, and THINK I have his true birth date ........... but then, his parents might have lied even then! That's just a little hunch that I have!
                                  My grandmother, on the beach, South Bay, Scarborough, undated photo (poss. 1929 or 1930)

                                  Researching Cadd, Schofield, Cottrell in Lancashire, Buckinghamshire; Taylor, Park in Westmorland; Hayhurst in Yorkshire, Westmorland, Lancashire; Hughes, Roberts in Wales.

                                  Comment


                                    #18
                                    I've found among my australian ancestors that they are accurate with information as known to the informants. In general the parents of english and german emmigrant ancestors were not known, but age was accurate. Whereas the irish and scots ancestors were often off with age but had correct parents on the emmigrant ancestor's deaths.

                                    There are only two instances i can think of with wrong information and still can't work out why.

                                    My australian great great grandmother registered the kids births in the 1890's and kept giving my great great grandfather's birthplace as paris, france. He was in fact born in port louis, mauritius. Whole family was mauritian for generations. His age was always off too.

                                    The other instance was my german 3rd great grandfather registering his kid's births in the 1860's, and saying his wife was born in berlin, germany. She was in fact born in a small pomeranian town in modern poland. Her parents had two still births in berlin, 13 years prior to her birth. So i think in this case she thought she had been born in berlin.

                                    Eastern australian bmd's are worth getting if you have rellies there. Queensland, victoria and new south wales are all quite informative. Tasmania and south australia have similar information to english records.

                                    Comment

                                    Working...
                                    X