Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Leaving Scotland your homeland

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Leaving Scotland your homeland

    Why would people leave Aberdeenshire Scotland to work in Preston Lancaster in 1849/51

    #2
    Unfortunately that's like asking 'how long is a piece of string'

    People travelled a lot further for work than we often think - for example one of mine travelled from Wales to England and then to the USA in the space of 9 years. It could be a family fall-out, it could be that he had family in Preston, he could have met a girl who lived in Preston, he could have thought there was better pay/prospects in Preston.

    You'll possibly never know, but I'd start by looking at the kind of work he did and then see if you can find out what was happening in both areas at that time. For the man from Wales I mentioned, I found newspaper stories about what was happening in his industry, which then made both of his moves entirely logical.

    Comment


      #3
      Travel was usually for work. Most of mine travelled from agricultural areas to working in the spinning and weaving of the industrial revolution.

      More money for one, even if dirty and hard.
      My parents at my brother's wedding, March 1952

      Researching Cadd, Schofield, Cottrell in Lancashire, Buckinghamshire; Taylor, Park in Westmorland; Hayhurst in Yorkshire, Westmorland, Lancashire; Hughes, Roberts in Wales.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Caz589 View Post
        Why would people leave Aberdeenshire Scotland to work in Preston Lancaster in 1849/51
        My peeps left from the area near Aberdeen to go to Ontario in the mid-1850s. Not just one family. Not just the sibs in one family.

        Kinda like the multiple siblings on another branch of my family that left Cornwall to go to work in the mines in Wisconsin.
        Last edited by PhotoFamily; 21-10-19, 01:44.
        ------------------------------------------------------
        My Families
        London-area Coverly Family Finder DNA Project

        Comment


          #5
          They should be on the census? can you not see the occupation? and also their neighbours? Also see what relatives were doing back home?

          I have a lot of movement in those times in my family, some of it was due to the railways.

          I do also wonder if the newspapers were more widely distributed due to the railways so people got to know more what was going on. A lot of my family went to Aus and went on assisted passages, these were advertised in the papers, but for all I know people may have gone to villages/towns and actively recruited.
          Carolyn
          Family Tree site

          Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
          Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

          Comment


            #6
            have you found these sites:
            https://shanklyhotel.com/preston/blo...ton-history-2/

            https://www.blogpreston.co.uk/presto...ry-of-preston/

            this has quite in depth history of Britain, but somehow lengthy and dry! but I often skim through it for various towns:
            https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vc.../vol7/pp91-105
            Carolyn
            Family Tree site

            Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
            Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

            Comment


              #7
              1849/1851 was at the very end of the Highland clearances and also there were agricultural problems which may have had an impact on the matter.
              https://www.britannica.com/event/Highland-Clearances

              Jay
              Janet in Yorkshire



              Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

              Comment


                #8
                Below taken from Ancestry DNA Timeline for Scottish Highlands & Islands...

                1825–1850
                Famine Hits the Highlands
                The Church of Scotland split in 1843, leading to the creation of the Free Church, which was particularly strong in Highland areas. Famine was no stranger in the Highlands, but the potato blight that swept Europe in the 1840s hit especially hard. Many Highlanders depended on their potato crops, and when they failed in 1846, followed by a harsh winter, famine and deaths followed. The Free Church, relief committees in the Lowlands, and the government provided some relief, so the Highlanders did not suffer as much as the Irish. Still, migration to the Lowlands, England, and overseas all increased.
                Matt
                My avatar is my fathers father,name unknown.............................

                Comment


                  #9
                  The Ribble Valley around Preston was a great cotton Manufacturing area so maybe that attracted, particularly if your family were weavers. Home industry like weaving did not give the sort of financial reward that factories gave.
                  Janet
                  Last edited by Janet; 22-10-19, 20:10.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X