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    Private William Bradley

    I'm looking for some help in sorting out who Private 310069 William Bradley, Royal Tank was attached to.

    Here is the background information:-

    Born: 16/08/1898, Fareham, Hampshire
    Parents: Walter and Ellen Bradley of 9 Cawtes Place, West Street, Fareham, Hampshire
    Enlisted: Winchester, Hampshire (25/07/1921) - Employed as a groom prior to enlisting.
    Discharged from service 24/07/1933
    Formerly Driver 851450, Royal Field Artillery 1/A Reserve Brigade, serving from 26/08/1914 to 18/03/1919. Also Driver 321, Royal Garrison Artillery. Paragraph 392 King's Regulations (xvia) Surplus to military requirements (having suffered impairment since entry into the service).
    Died: 13/03/1936 (aged 37) at 'The Mount' Sanatorium, Bishopstoke, Eastleigh, Hampshire from tuberculous mediastinal abscesses causing tuberculosis of the spine.
    Buried: Fareham Cemetery

    I'd be very grateful to hear from anyone who may be able to shed some light on my query, without having to resort to obtaining his service record. If he was the only chap I was researching then this would not be an issue, but alas I have over 400!

    Many thanks!

    #2
    what exactly are you looking for his marriage?


    Val

    Comment


      #3
      Which tank regiment he was attached to.

      Here is another piece of information relating to his funeral:-
      https://search.findmypast.co.uk/bna/...19360320%2f046

      Comment


        #4
        Still looking for some help on this one if anyone has any ideas.

        Comment


          #5
          Where have you been searching?
          Carolyn
          Family Tree site

          Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
          Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

          Comment


            #6
            The report of his funeral in the Hampshire Telegraph of 20/3/1936 refers to William Bradley as "late of 9th Queens Royal Lancers", which was originally a Cavalry Regiment.

            merleyone

            Comment


              #7
              I assume you have seen this:
              https://search.findmypast.co.uk/reco...FTANK%2F086180
              Carolyn
              Family Tree site

              Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
              Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

              Comment


                #8
                HTSCF Fareham

                I have only just seen Post 7 with its attachment, a very interesting and informative document which you may already have seen as you clearly knew the details of William Bradley's war service.
                Although this document is shown as a record of the Royal Tank Corps 1919-1945, the reality is that this page of the record covers the Attesting of men in 1921 until their discharge by 1933 etc. The clue to their individual regiments is within this record where Six men are listed who attested at a variety of locations in 1921 but completion on the LH side of the record is in the same hand and must have been completed centrally from information when attested.
                Ignoring the first entry, the remaining five men all have an annotation below their names, either 9L, 12L or 17L which is most probably Army "shorthand" for 9th,12th and 17th Lancers, all completely separate cavalry regiments.
                William Bradley has the annotation 9L and the 9th Lancers (9th Queen's Royal Lancers) was the regiment mentioned in his funeral report as the regiment in which he served.
                The two men with Army numbers 310070 and 310072 had the annotation 17L and clearly served with the 17th Lancers until their early discharge in 1922, as their last entry shows. That was the same year as the 17th Lancers amalgamated with the 21st Lancers to form a single cavalry regiment from two,17th/21st Lancers, with a consequent reduction in numbers. The remaining three men were all discharged in 1933 after twelve years service, most likely with the Cavalry regiments they joined.
                Unlike most Army regiments, Cavalry regiments did not have their own Depots where, amongst other matters, regimental records were created and maintained, so shared a central Cavalry Depot with other Cavalry regiments, showing men from different Cavalry regiments on the sane record.
                The men's discharge is clearly shown at Canterbury and as the Cavalry Depot was at Canterbury, it is likely that was also where this record started its life.

                All cavalry regiments faced major changes after WW1 when it became apparent that the day of the traditional cavalry had passed.
                Over many years following, change was suggested to re- quip cavalry by replacing horses with motorised vehicles or light tanks, theoretically enabling the cavalry to continue with their prime function of conducting reconnaissance in the field.

                The 9th Lancers only became mechanised in 1936 when their horses were replaced with light tracked vehicles, even though unfit for purpose as was discovered in 1940.
                Early in 1939, all armoured regiments, including Dragoons, Lancers and the Royal Tank Regiment, were incorporated into the Royal Armoured Corps.

                William Bradley is unlikely to have had any formal involvement with the Tank Corps, Royal Tank Corps or Royal Tank Regiment as he was discharged in 1933 when his regiment was still a traditional cavalry regiment with horses, and died in 1936 just as his old regiment was about to mechanise.

                His regiment continued as the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers until 1960 when it was finally amalgamated with the 12th Lancers to become the 9th/12th Lancers.


                Hope this helps and would appreciate any comments.


                merleyone

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by merleyone View Post
                  HTSCF Fareham

                  I have only just seen Post 7 with its attachment, a very interesting and informative document which you may already have seen as you clearly knew the details of William Bradley's war service.
                  Although this document is shown as a record of the Royal Tank Corps 1919-1945, the reality is that this page of the record covers the Attesting of men in 1921 until their discharge by 1933 etc. The clue to their individual regiments is within this record where Six men are listed who attested at a variety of locations in 1921 but completion on the LH side of the record is in the same hand and must have been completed centrally from information when attested.
                  Ignoring the first entry, the remaining five men all have an annotation below their names, either 9L, 12L or 17L which is most probably Army "shorthand" for 9th,12th and 17th Lancers, all completely separate cavalry regiments.
                  William Bradley has the annotation 9L and the 9th Lancers (9th Queen's Royal Lancers) was the regiment mentioned in his funeral report as the regiment in which he served.
                  The two men with Army numbers 310070 and 310072 had the annotation 17L and clearly served with the 17th Lancers until their early discharge in 1922, as their last entry shows. That was the same year as the 17th Lancers amalgamated with the 21st Lancers to form a single cavalry regiment from two,17th/21st Lancers, with a consequent reduction in numbers. The remaining three men were all discharged in 1933 after twelve years service, most likely with the Cavalry regiments they joined.
                  Unlike most Army regiments, Cavalry regiments did not have their own Depots where, amongst other matters, regimental records were created and maintained, so shared a central Cavalry Depot with other Cavalry regiments, showing men from different Cavalry regiments on the sane record.
                  The men's discharge is clearly shown at Canterbury and as the Cavalry Depot was at Canterbury, it is likely that was also where this record started its life.

                  All cavalry regiments faced major changes after WW1 when it became apparent that the day of the traditional cavalry had passed.
                  Over many years following, change was suggested to re- quip cavalry by replacing horses with motorised vehicles or light tanks, theoretically enabling the cavalry to continue with their prime function of conducting reconnaissance in the field.

                  The 9th Lancers only became mechanised in 1936 when their horses were replaced with light tracked vehicles, even though unfit for purpose as was discovered in 1940.
                  Early in 1939, all armoured regiments, including Dragoons, Lancers and the Royal Tank Regiment, were incorporated into the Royal Armoured Corps.

                  William Bradley is unlikely to have had any formal involvement with the Tank Corps, Royal Tank Corps or Royal Tank Regiment as he was discharged in 1933 when his regiment was still a traditional cavalry regiment with horses, and died in 1936 just as his old regiment was about to mechanise.

                  His regiment continued as the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers until 1960 when it was finally amalgamated with the 12th Lancers to become the 9th/12th Lancers.


                  Hope this helps and would appreciate any comments.


                  merleyone
                  That is amazing that you got so much from that document, I hope that they come back and read this.
                  Carolyn
                  Family Tree site

                  Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                  Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Had you not posted the attachment in your post 7, I would not have known much. When I read the attachment, I was struck by the information that was there and the clues that needed following up. After I had done that, I was able to show this man had served in the 9th Lancers only, from 1921 until discharge in 1933 and was unlikely to have even come into contact with the Royal Tank Regiment. I believe it was the poor heading of the file in which this document was placed which must have caused confusion about the regiment he had served in coupled with a belief his regiment must have been associated with the Royal Tank Regiment.

                    I enjoyed the search and learnt quite a lot about the cavalry and the army so ,any thanks you for your posting,

                    merleyone

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by merleyone View Post
                      HTSCF Fareham

                      I have only just seen Post 7 with its attachment, a very interesting and informative document which you may already have seen as you clearly knew the details of William Bradley's war service.
                      Although this document is shown as a record of the Royal Tank Corps 1919-1945, the reality is that this page of the record covers the Attesting of men in 1921 until their discharge by 1933 etc. The clue to their individual regiments is within this record where Six men are listed who attested at a variety of locations in 1921 but completion on the LH side of the record is in the same hand and must have been completed centrally from information when attested.
                      Ignoring the first entry, the remaining five men all have an annotation below their names, either 9L, 12L or 17L which is most probably Army "shorthand" for 9th,12th and 17th Lancers, all completely separate cavalry regiments.
                      William Bradley has the annotation 9L and the 9th Lancers (9th Queen's Royal Lancers) was the regiment mentioned in his funeral report as the regiment in which he served.
                      The two men with Army numbers 310070 and 310072 had the annotation 17L and clearly served with the 17th Lancers until their early discharge in 1922, as their last entry shows. That was the same year as the 17th Lancers amalgamated with the 21st Lancers to form a single cavalry regiment from two,17th/21st Lancers, with a consequent reduction in numbers. The remaining three men were all discharged in 1933 after twelve years service, most likely with the Cavalry regiments they joined.
                      Unlike most Army regiments, Cavalry regiments did not have their own Depots where, amongst other matters, regimental records were created and maintained, so shared a central Cavalry Depot with other Cavalry regiments, showing men from different Cavalry regiments on the sane record.
                      The men's discharge is clearly shown at Canterbury and as the Cavalry Depot was at Canterbury, it is likely that was also where this record started its life.

                      All cavalry regiments faced major changes after WW1 when it became apparent that the day of the traditional cavalry had passed.
                      Over many years following, change was suggested to re- quip cavalry by replacing horses with motorised vehicles or light tanks, theoretically enabling the cavalry to continue with their prime function of conducting reconnaissance in the field.

                      The 9th Lancers only became mechanised in 1936 when their horses were replaced with light tracked vehicles, even though unfit for purpose as was discovered in 1940.
                      Early in 1939, all armoured regiments, including Dragoons, Lancers and the Royal Tank Regiment, were incorporated into the Royal Armoured Corps.

                      William Bradley is unlikely to have had any formal involvement with the Tank Corps, Royal Tank Corps or Royal Tank Regiment as he was discharged in 1933 when his regiment was still a traditional cavalry regiment with horses, and died in 1936 just as his old regiment was about to mechanise.

                      His regiment continued as the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers until 1960 when it was finally amalgamated with the 12th Lancers to become the 9th/12th Lancers.


                      Hope this helps and would appreciate any comments.


                      merleyone
                      This is absolutely fantastic, thank you!! I am very grateful for the in-depth research and reasoning that you have applied. Piecing all this together, this I believe, finally solves the mystery and I am happy to show him as belonging to the 9th Lancers. In short, the heading of the document as in post #7 was the thing that confused the issue.

                      Thanks for your perseverance!

                      Comment

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