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    Non conformist burials?

    Sorry if I've asked this one before, but I am only just touching the surface of my non-conformists!

    Am I right in thinking they had to marry in Parish Churches and have their children baptised there, but that they kept their own burial records? If so are these accessible & also where were they buried, would it be in the Parish churchyard or did they have their own little plots?

    Thanks & sorry if I seem to have lost the plot lol

    :)
    Last edited by Joan of Archives; 08-04-08, 16:53. Reason: spelt Parish Pariah lol !

    Joanie

    #2
    They definitely didn't have to have their children baptised at the parish church, that much I do know, Joan.
    KiteRunner

    Every five years or so I look back on my life and I have a good... laugh"
    (Indigo Girls, "Watershed")

    Comment


      #3
      Before 1837 they had to marry in the C of E unless they were Jewish or Quaker.

      They could be baptised where they chose, but they might find it more difficult to get parish relief if they were not baptised C of E, so sometimes poorer non-cons would have their children bap in the C of E (sometimes in addition to their non-con church!). Quakers didn't allow this though (didn't allow members to enter a C of E church!! lol)

      Burials often had to take place in C of E churchyards (No bells. No service, unless their own minister was allowed to officiate) if there was nowhere else (often the case in villages etc). Most of my Methodists buried in Whittlesford Cambs (1820's - 1900) are in the churchyard with headstones, but they are very close to the edge! lol One local dignitary had a semi-circle made in the churchyard wall so that he could be interred in unconsecrated ground but still be in a protected environment and not in the farmers field nextdoor!!

      Comment


        #4
        I have several Methodists in Knottingley, W Yorkshire and the burial registers have 2 columns stating whether the burials are in consecrated or unconsecrated grounds (the Methodists being in unconsecrated graves which I believe were in a separate area of the churchyard)

        Jackie
        Jackie

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          #5
          Thanks everyone!!

          I think I understand now lol

          What's with the unconsecrated ground bit though? I thought all Christians had to be buried in consecrated ground, whatever their denomination?


          Joanie

          Comment


            #6
            In some areas there were non-comformist cemetries, although over time I think they may have become more generally used.

            After 1837 Marriage Notice Registers were kept for marriages intended to be performed in register offices and in churches and chapels (other than those of the Church of England) licensed for marriages. Sort of equivalent to a banns register.

            Ice

            Comment


              #7
              Consecrated ground is ground which has been blessed by the Bishop or Archbishop of the C of E church. If you were noncon you wouldn't want to be buried in C of E ground.

              Many of my early noncons were buried in their own denomination's burial ground attached to their chapel or meeting house. Unfortunately most of these burial grounds are long gone and it is pot luck whether the records survive or not.

              Comment


                #8
                Bushey has a URC (formerly Congregational, I think) which has a small graveyard around it. There's a book with transcriptions in the local Library, in the Local Studies section.

                Christine
                Researching: BENNETT (Leics/Birmingham-ish) - incl. Leonard BENNETT in Detroit & Florida ; WARR/WOR, STRATFORD & GARDNER/GARNAR (Oxon); CHRISTMAS, RUSSELL, PAFOOT/PAFFORD (Hants); BIGWOOD, HAYLER/HAILOR (Sussex); LANCASTER (Beds, Berks, Wilts) - plus - COCKS (Spitalfields, Liverpool, Plymouth); RUSE/ROWSE, TREMEER, WADLIN(G)/WADLETON (Devonport, E Cornwall); GOULD (S Devon); CHAPMAN, HALL/HOLE, HORN (N Devon); BARRON, SCANTLEBURY (Mevagissey)...

                Comment


                  #9
                  I was allowed to look round the small Baptist graveyard in Rothley recently, when I was hoping to find my great-grandfather's gravestone. They also brought out their minute books for me to read through, which was interesting.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I have two or three generations of the same family all buried in the same non conformist graveyard. They were big supporters of the local congregational church. I spend some time a few years ago going through their records, and although they were a bit of a mess, it was quite helpful.
                    Jenny

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm not sure how much it answers the question, but there are some interesting stories of unconsecrated burials here :-

                      Unconsecrated Burials of Britain - the history, stories and legends
                      Joan

                      "Nepotism - We promote family values here as often as we promote family members"- Larry Kersten, American sociologist and author

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                        #12
                        Joan have you looked at those Non Parochial records - gawd, cant remember the site now, but I found a bunch of my non conformists burials there

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Is this the one you mean, Heather?

                          BMD Registers: The Official Non-Parochial BMDs Service
                          KiteRunner

                          Every five years or so I look back on my life and I have a good... laugh"
                          (Indigo Girls, "Watershed")

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thats the one Kite :) I was really pleased to find a bunch of my Rotherhithe people in the burials on there at an Independent Chapel.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Hi again

                              Thanks for your replies, I have tried that site & no joy :(

                              Never mind, at least I know it may be worth looking at the edge of the churchyard, lol!

                              :D

                              Joanie

                              Comment


                                #16
                                In our cemetery it was a case of 'them' and 'us', one lot on the left and the others on the right, only now we're running out of space and we're all getting put in together - Oh dear :)

                                I did read somewhere that non-conformists liked to keep a foot in each camp as it were and would use the Church for the important things but still worship each Sunday in their non-conformist Chapel.

                                Also I seem to remember some comments about wedding pictures looking so much better when taken outside the Church rather than the plainer Chapels!

                                Margaret
                                Margaret

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                                  #17
                                  Does anyone know St Pauls Brunswick Square, Bristol?

                                  I've googled and found the church but wondered about their burial ground.

                                  I have Elizabeth Ariel, her husband, Myles and mother Elizabeth Naylor all buried there with headstones(1820s to 1840). They were staunch non-cons so would they be in the unconsecrated area??

                                  Comment


                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Harrys mum View Post
                                    They were staunch non-cons so would they be in the unconsecrated area??

                                    Usually there wouldn't have been such a thing in a C of E churchyard! (I would nearly have said never!)

                                    Comment


                                      #19
                                      Maybe money spoke as loudly then as now.

                                      Comment


                                        #20
                                        More likely everyone who lived in that parish had the right to be buried there. Though if you were rich you might get to be buried there even if you didn't live in the parish!

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