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What became of Ethel?

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  • #41
    I think this article in Vogue may be her too, but you need to have a subscription to view it properly:

    MAY 15, 1925
    EACH EVENING RENDEZVOUS WITH PARIS IS A NEW ADVENTURE
    E. WINIFRED BOULTER

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    • #42
      The article says she was a journalist in France, and if you search the British Newspaper Archive/FMP under Winifred Boulter you'll see a few articles that may be hers. There are also some on Trove.

      I've only glanced at them. but several are about interior design. There is also one in the Yorkshire Post dated 1 April 1938 entitled "Living in France with the French" and another in the Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough dated 7 March 1939 entitled "France's Unique Corps of Red Cross Workers" with the subtitle "Parachute Workers".

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      • #43
        Thank you teasie - a wonderful find Ethel sounds to have been a strong character.

        Going by the location of the presumed death registration, I think she may have lived in Herne Bay (or environs) in the 1950's, where a Miss Boulter was involved in a couple of flag days for charities.
        Lol, that brings back memories of my schooldays and being sent out on lifeboat day to sell flags to the day trippers in the early 60's

        ETA - have only just seen your 2 later posts. Will be reading the papers this afternoon!!
        Last edited by Janet in Yorkshire; 31-03-23, 09:14.
        Janet in Yorkshire



        Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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        • #44
          Originally posted by Janet in Yorkshire View Post
          Ethel Winifred Boulter was born Plumstead Kent, birth registered Q3 1887. Her father was Walter Ernest Boulter (a doctor, who was employed at the Woolwich Infirmary, where the family lived in) and Agnes Maud, late Hogg, formerly Jones.. Ethel had a younger brother Philip. Both children were at the infirmary with their parents in 1901 and 1911 and the parents were also recorded there in 1921. In 1911 brother Philip Pullyn Boulter sailed to Canada to farm - he joined the Canadian army and served in WW1, marrying in England in 1918. He and his wife Violet went to Canada and had a son in 1920, but later returned to mod apk getmodnow and settled in Norfolk.

          I can find nothing for Ethel after 1911. nothing apparent in 1921 or 1939, can't follow through a possible marriage, couldn't link her with her brother and family in Canada. The parents died in 1927 - Walter in February and "of Plumstead Infirmary" and effects left to widow & probate granted London. Widow Agnes died November & probate granted at Norwich to son Philip in December 1927.

          The only feasible death registration I can find is 1959, Bridge Reg dist, Kent - Ethel W Boulter b 1887. I suspect this is probably my lady; but, if so, where was she between 1911 and 1959?
          It can be quite challenging to trace someone's whereabouts if there are no apparent records available. One possibility is that Ethel Winifred Boulter got married and changed her surname, which could make it harder to find information about her. If she did get married, she might have moved to a different part of the country or even emigrated, making it even more challenging to track her down.

          Another possibility is that Ethel might have changed her first name or used a nickname, making it harder to identify her in records. It's also possible that she worked in a profession that wasn't well-documented, such as becoming a teacher, a nurse, or working for the civil service.

          Without more information, it's difficult to say for sure what happened to Ethel Winifred Boulter after 1911. The death registration you found in 1959 could be her, but it's also possible that it's a different person with the same name.
          ‚Äč

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          • #45
            Hi Linda and thank you for your interest in and contribution to my thread about Ethel.
            Due to brilliant sleuthing of newspaper articles by Carolyn and teasie, I am now confident that Ethel worked in France in the 1920's and 1930's, writing as E Winifred Boulter. Also during the 1950 incident re inability to renew her passport, she reported that she was the daughter of the late Dr Walter Boulter - still using her birth surname and so apparently unmarried and 63 years old.
            I found 1950's newspaper references to a Miss Boulter (no initial or forename mentioned) selling flags for charities in the Herne Bay area. Ethel's father and his siblings were born at Herne in Kent, where their parents were Master and Mistress of the workhouse, before moving to take charge of the Norwich workhouse in 1862. Their father died in December 1862 and their mother then found an appointment as matron of a workhouse in the Manchester area.
            Ethel's paternal grandmother was born in Shorne, Kent, so maybe the county had some significance for Ethel's father and was a location she herself had been familiar with during her early life.

            I do wonder if she first went to France during WW1, but have been unable as yet to find any reference for this. The book re life in the internment camp in France is due to arrive on Monday/Tuesday - it should provide some background as to what life was like for Ethel during 1940-1941.
            Janet in Yorkshire



            Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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            • #46
              teasie ooh a few more finds, how lovely.

              Flag selling sounds like her too, she has turned into quite a find
              Carolyn
              Family Tree site

              Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
              Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

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              • #47
                And a big thanks to everyone who joined me on this journey. Their constant hard work on my behalf spurred me on and motivated me to keep on going.
                Janet in Yorkshire



                Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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                • #48
                  the articles she wrote are interesting that she was interviewing various ladys etc, lots about Red Cross, that all ties in to the passport article. Nothing about her actually getting passport
                  Carolyn
                  Family Tree site

                  Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                  Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Have finished the book. Seems the interned persons had to remain under arrest until they were 60, so that suggests Ethel would have spent the whole of the war incarcerated. The writer of the diary was released in 1941, just after her 60th birthday.
                    Not a nice place to be - the editor of the book managed to get in touch with some of the other internees (or their descendants) and has added additional information about life in camp and then in a large former hotel which was commandeered. Freezing cold, squalid; bedbug, lice and flea infestations, sanitation and food (scarcity of both) absolutely appalling.
                    Last edited by Janet in Yorkshire; 09-04-23, 10:21.
                    Janet in Yorkshire



                    Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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                    • #50
                      how sad, poor Ethel.
                      Carolyn
                      Family Tree site

                      Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                      Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Seems that in the early days the Red Cross were involved in the welfare of the internees and there is info on receiving red cross parcels and also letters from families. I wonder if Ethel was linked to Red Cross action in the camp? It reads like, that apart from potato peeling duties/fetching in wood for the stoves/trips to the basic bathroom facilities and carrying water up several flights of stairs, the women were mainly restricted to their shared dormitory.
                        I taught infants, so I'm fine with blood and vomit, but anything to do with toilet smells makes me gag (didn't have children, have never changed a nappy) - my stomach began to heave just reading the sanitised account in the book At the age of sixty, they were given some francs, released and left to find their own way back to their home in France. They then reported daily to the local gendarmerie.
                        Janet in Yorkshire



                        Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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