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  • marriage question

    Just came across this and not quite sure what it means
    1 nov 1733 Fleet Prison and Rules of the Fleet London England

    this is the marriage of Richard Homewood and Mary Shove

    Does it mean he was in the navy prison when they married?

  • #2
    No, they were actually illegal marriages conducted by ?retired or defrocked priests in the area of the Fleet Prison in London. You need to Google that. I think they were one of the reasons for bringing in the Marriage Act in ?1765?

    Anne

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gloryer View Post
      Just came across this and not quite sure what it means
      1 nov 1733 Fleet Prison and Rules of the Fleet London England

      this is the marriage of Richard Homewood and Mary Shove

      Does it mean he was in the navy prison when they married?
      It sounds like he was in prison but was 'well off' enough he could live in a house outside of the prison but within its walls, the article explains it better.

      have a look here it mentions Fleet prison, very interesting indeed:

      https://www.familyhistory.co.uk/pari...20ready%20cash.
      Julie
      They're coming to take me away haha hee hee..........

      .......I find dead people

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      • #4
        ok thanks

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        • #5
          Gloryer, I have a couple that married at the Fleet prison as well. They were from Leicestershire.

          Very interesting read as Anne says. We ended up with quite a bit of info on both of them. Mine was 1754. You have set me thinking why they went to London to marry, both 'of age' and first child born exactly a year later in Leicester. Might be my project for this afternoon!!
          Lin

          Searching Lowe, Everitt, Hurt and Dunns in Nottingham

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          • #6
            not quite sure what to make of it. lol, Supposedly my 7th great grandparents. I have their first child born 1734 so maybe she was showing as expectant so they rushed to get married

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            • #7
              I think the church could be very strict in those days. Perhaps even one set of parents refused to let them marry and was easier to go elsewhere and get married with no fuss.

              I have another clandestine/ illegal marriage and they went to court over it and it was because they married in another church without the banns being read in the local church.
              Lin

              Searching Lowe, Everitt, Hurt and Dunns in Nottingham

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lin Fisher View Post
                I think the church could be very strict in those days. Perhaps even one set of parents refused to let them marry and was easier to go elsewhere and get married with no fuss.

                I have another clandestine/ illegal marriage and they went to court over it and it was because they married in another church without the banns being read in the local church.
                Ah! thanks, that's the word I was looking for 'clandestine'. Couldn't think of it in the heat of the moment.
                I don't think it meant the groom or bride was actually in prison. Just that as explained above it was tricky for them to get married conventionally, which at that time was only in church (with exceptions for Jews and Quakers I think).

                Anne

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