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  • Looking for London street maps

    Hello

    I'm trying to find a map of London, both north and south of the river, as I'm trying to find all the roads that my London family lived in. Many of the streets are now gone and I'm not sure when this grand development would have begun, with roads being changed along with rebuilding.

    Any help with locating a map of this sort, or advice on what sort of date London began 'changing' would be much appreciated.

    Thank you
    AT

  • #2
    I use NLS maps after someone mentioned them on here:

    https://maps.nls.uk/geo/find/#zoom=5...&z=0&point=0,0

    the side by side viewer can be a big help if you start with an existing road, and then you can kind of get your nearings.
    https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side...ight=ESRIWorld

    the older maps are not all available on the side by side
    Carolyn
    Family Tree site

    Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
    Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

    Comment


    • #3
      I find the Charles Booth poverty maps fascinating, especially if you are looking at the latter part of the 19th century. You can also link to the notebooks where they are available that give a non PC observation of the street/area.

      Map | Charles Booth's London (lse.ac.uk)
      Bubblebelle x

      FAMILY INTERESTS: Pitts of Sherborne Gloucs. Deaney (Bucks). Pye of Kent. Randolph of Lydd, Kent. Youell of Norfolk and Suffolk. Howe of Lampton. Carden of Bucks.

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      • #4
        Arthurteacake welcome to the forum

        There are many maps going back a long way here: Mapco London maps

        Comment


        • #5
          Not so much streets as parishes, but I find this map to be useful for determining how close parishes are to each other. It's weird, and it's static in time (1851).

          maps.familysearch.org

          put the parish name in the upper left box and <search>
          select the parish you want
          in the box that appears over the map, select radius search andchoose the radius you want (defaults to 5mi) and press <go>
          The map will focus on the area you chose, and list the parishes down the left side with their distance for your chosen parish.
          Other options on the app will show you Poor Law Union, Civil Reg district and more
          ------------------------------------------------------
          My Families
          London-area Coverly Family Finder DNA Project

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you very much for the responses, I'll look into those suggestions.

            AT

            Comment


            • #7
              Depending on the period(s) you are interested in, there is the normal London A-Z. I have the 'Historical Version' of the 1938/39 that at the back has an Index (before & afterwards) of LCC Street Name Changes.

              Another aid is .. https://www.maps.thehunthouse.com/London_Miscellany.htm that has an E-Book edition of London street name changes between 1857-1929 and 1929-1945.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Xenofex2 View Post
                Depending on the period(s) you are interested in, there is the normal London A-Z. I have the 'Historical Version' of the 1938/39 that at the back has an Index (before & afterwards) of LCC Street Name Changes.

                Another aid is .. https://www.maps.thehunthouse.com/London_Miscellany.htm that has an E-Book edition of London street name changes between 1857-1929 and 1929-1945.
                Thanks for your suggestions

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi, I’ve come to this somewhat belatedly, but I’ll add my suggestion. I’ve done some research into family in London and have found Alan Godfrey maps useful and not too expensive either. Hope this helps.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A post script to my last message. They also do maps for the rest of the country, not just London.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not maps - but a narrative on the history of a grid square - I have found this blog useful. looks like the poster hasn't made any new posts for a while
                      http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/
                      Carolyn
                      Family Tree site

                      Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                      Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GB43 View Post
                        Hi, I’ve come to this somewhat belatedly, but I’ll add my suggestion. I’ve done some research into family in London and have found Alan Godfrey maps useful and not too expensive either. Hope this helps.
                        Yes, I find these really useful for rural areas as it names the various farms. With most of my extended families working on the land, it's really helpful to be able to plot how they moved around. A move to the next farm could place them in a different parish, even though they'd only gone with the previous employer's son, who'd set up farming in his own establishment. Also farm names can be helpful in de-cyphering a place of birth given on a census return. One old boy was recorded as born in Bohemia ("never", thought I, then I discovered two farms named Upper and Lower Bohemia. )
                        Janet in Yorkshire



                        Genealogists never die - they just swap places in the family tree

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                        • #13
                          Love looking at maps, particularly the old ones. As you mentioned Janet, they can be very useful in plotting where people moved to. There’s a piece on the Alan Godfrey page from a researcher explaining how she has used maps to help trace families. I read it this morning after getting their newsletter.

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                          • #14
                            I like looking at maps too, I hadn't realised there are a few more options out there, good thread.
                            Carolyn
                            Family Tree site

                            Researching: Luggs, Freeman - Cornwall; Dayman, Hobbs, Heard - Devon; Wilson, Miles - Northants; Brett, Everett, Clark, Allum - Herts/Essex
                            Also interested in Proctor, Woodruff

                            Comment

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