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Lambtons, Dawson-Lambtons and Earls of Durham

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    Lambtons, Dawson-Lambtons and Earls of Durham

    Hello all,

    There had long been a rumour in my family that when my ancestor Matthew married a Phoebe Dawson Lambton in 1829 that their children were related to the Earls of Durham and Biddick Hall. However, the story I uncovered so far has left me a little confused.

    It appears my ancestry were originally Dawsons and in the employ of a Mary Lambton of Biddick Hall, Durham. When she died the whole estate to John Dawson who then took on the name Lambton. He seems to live a life of luxury getting himself painted and handing out large sums of money and property in his will but died after a short while putting his children under the guardianship of a William Donkin of Sandhoe, Hexham. Soon after the estate was sold to the current Lambtons who are now the Earls of Lambton. Lambton as a middle name was passed down through my family

    Several questions arise from this:
    1. How common was it to give people in your employ the whole estate and would they be servants or something else?
    2. How common was it to take your mistresses last name and why would you do it?
    3. What happened to the property that meant it wasn't passed to my ancestry or was it?

    If anyone can throw some light on these questions or the conundrum in general I would appreciate it greatly.
    Thank you for taking the time to read it.

    #2
    The Lambton Estates website says he was her nephew, and he sold the property on.

    https://www.lambtonestates.com/biddick-gardens/history/

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Jill on the A272 View Post
      The Lambton Estates website says he was her nephew, and he sold the property on.

      https://www.lambtonestates.com/biddick-gardens/history/
      The strange thing is apart from the Lambton Estates I haven't found any other book or reference saying they were related. Would you have your nephew in your employ?

      Comment


        #4
        Yes, rich people often employed relatives, either it was a genuine job or some kind of sinecure.. It is called nepotism, lol and still goes on today, not just by the rich but by anyone who is an employer. Nothing unusual about it.

        OC

        Comment


          #5
          If you obtain her will it may describe their relationship, I have transcribed dozens and beneficiaries are often described as X the son of my brother Y, or A the son of my sister B wife of C. He could be a great nephew as I have seen that degree missed and someone just described as nephew.

          Comment


            #6
            My husband is from Sunderland and his sister thought there was more to the Lambton middle name their father had. I haven't found anything either; Penshaw Monument is a stone's throw away from where they lived.
            Elaine

            Looking for Ward, Moore, Hunt, Warren...and who was Gertrude Wills

            http://leicestermoores.tribalpages.com
            http://wardnottsleics.tribalpages.com

            Comment


              #7
              Even children were treated as employees by some families. Poor kids!
              My grandmother, on the beach, South Bay, Scarborough, undated photo (poss. 1929 or 1930)

              Researching Cadd, Schofield, Cottrell in Lancashire, Buckinghamshire; Taylor, Park in Westmorland; Hayhurst in Yorkshire, Westmorland, Lancashire; Hughes, Roberts in Wales.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Jill on the A272 View Post
                If you obtain her will it may describe their relationship, I have transcribed dozens and beneficiaries are often described as X the son of my brother Y, or A the son of my sister B wife of C. He could be a great nephew as I have seen that degree missed and someone just described as nephew.
                I've been having a look online but obviously because it was made before 1858 it's not held by the government. I can't find it on Ancestry or the National Archives. Where do you think it would be?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by MJLCarr View Post
                  Hello all,

                  2. How common was it to take your mistresses last name and why would you do it?

                  .
                  I have a few instances in my tree where people have taken on an extra surname as it was a stipulation made by the testator in their will.
                  In the three instances I can think of off the top of my head, the testator was childless and it was a means of carrying on the family name.

                  Christine
                  Researching:
                  HOEY (Co Fermanagh, other Ulster counties and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) BANNIGAN and FOX (Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland and Portland, Maine, USA) REYNOLDS, McSHEA, PATTERSON and GOAN (Corker and Creevy, Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland) DYER (Belfast and Ballymacarrett) SLEVIN and TIMONEY (Co Fermanagh) BARNETT (Ballagh, Co Tyrone and Strangford, Co Down)

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by MJLCarr View Post

                    I've been having a look online but obviously because it was made before 1858 it's not held by the government. I can't find it on Ancestry or the National Archives. Where do you think it would be?
                    Is the Mary Lambton you mentioned in post 1 the 1813 one in this collection of Durham wills?
                    She was a spinster, so my comment in post 9 might well apply...

                    http://reed.dur.ac.uk/xtf/view?docId...1b2773v69d.xml

                    Christine
                    Researching:
                    HOEY (Co Fermanagh, other Ulster counties and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) BANNIGAN and FOX (Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland and Portland, Maine, USA) REYNOLDS, McSHEA, PATTERSON and GOAN (Corker and Creevy, Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, Ireland) DYER (Belfast and Ballymacarrett) SLEVIN and TIMONEY (Co Fermanagh) BARNETT (Ballagh, Co Tyrone and Strangford, Co Down)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Karamazov View Post

                      Is the Mary Lambton you mentioned in post 1 the 1813 one in this collection of Durham wills?
                      She was a spinster, so my comment in post 9 might well apply...

                      http://reed.dur.ac.uk/xtf/view?docId...1b2773v69d.xml

                      Christine
                      Yes, that looks like her. How would I go about getting access to it?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        You can access a copy of her Will at FamilySearch here: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61...:S3HY-DZZ7-HDL

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Vivian View Post
                          You can access a copy of her Will at FamilySearch here: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61...:S3HY-DZZ7-HDL
                          Thank you so much

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