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Janet in Yorkshire

  1. The sad life of my great aunt Bridget McDonough, Mrs Stephen Cochrane

    I wept when I finally pieced together the sad tale of the awful life of poor great-aunt Bridget, whom I'd never heard of until I began my research. This blog entry is my attempt to record all the trials and adversities that one poor and uneducated Northumbrian woman of Irish descent faced during an all too short life. I'm sure there were many other women like Bridget - too many children, too little money and no prospects of a better life.

    My great aunt Bridget was the third child ...
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  2. 1940 USA census

    I've had great fun tracking descendents of my Hogans and Careys who, in the 1880's, swapped the mines and shipyards of Northumberland for the mines of Pennsylvania and the shipyards of Ohio.
    1940 census was especially interesting - quite a lot of people aged 15 to 25 and people 55 and over who didn't have any occupation recorded.
    It was only when I came across one household with two residents recorded as employed in "new work" that the penny dropped, as it were. 1930's - the ...
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  3. Hannah Abel and Edward Broughton, Ontario pioneers

    My great-grandad George Abel had an elder sister named Hannah, who was born in East Yorkshire c1834. Whilst I'm still unsure of Hannah's precise birthplace, I do know that by 1839 her parents (James and Mary Ann Abel) had settled in the small Yorkshire village of Huggate where a younger sister was born and baptised and where the family were recorded in 1841 census.

    When census was taken in 1851, Hannah was living at Huggate Rectory where she was a house servant in the employ of widower ...

    Updated 13-08-12 at 22:47 by Janet in Yorkshire

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  4. The baby boy left behind

    In October 1868 20 year old Mark Finch married his first cousin Thirza Mickleburgh in the parish church at Horningtoft Norfolk. (Thirza was 13 years older than Mark.) The couple were recorded in their home in Horningtoft when census was taken on 2 April 1871 and just a week later, on 9 April, Thirza gave birth to their first child, a son, whom they named Alfred. Sadly Thirza died and ten days later she was laid to rest in the village churchyard. Baby Alfred was not baptised until October 1871, an ...
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