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AlanC
11-11-10, 17:38
This occupation is written on a Marriage Certificate in Liverpool 1876. I can find no reference to it from a Google search.............has anyone any ideas. Since I'm transcribing, I dont desperately want to know...just curious.
I should add that the writing is very clear and no doubt about what is written.

Olde Crone Holden
11-11-10, 18:11
I would have said Spiral turner, but you say the writing is very clear.

However, are you transcribing from original records or from copied records?

If the name is not too common, maybe we could find him/them on a census and see what work he's doing?

OC

AlanC
11-11-10, 18:22
Hello O.C....thanks for your response. The detail is from the Parish Register and the Marriage dated 30/9/1876 is of a Sarah Anne Watkins aged 22 of 27 Stonewall Street, Everton, Liverpool. Her father, William Watkins is deceased. Definately Spital, the 't' is crossed.
The groom is 24 year old Charles Turpin but not related to 'Dick'
Sorry should have said the Bride's father was the Spital Turner.

Uncle John
11-11-10, 22:42
I'd side with OC and assume the crossed letter was a mistake. I can recognise most engineering occupations, and "spital" makes no sense in this context.

naomiatt
12-11-10, 07:41
This is a real off shot - could it mean Splitter - (splitting timber or wood) - otherwise, there's Spittleman but that seems to mean Hospital Attendent and that doesn't make sense with being a Turner...Spital is an old word for hospital which I didn't realize until just now when I looked at the meaning of Spitalfields.

AlanC
12-11-10, 10:03
Maybe the Cleric who entered the details made a mistake and who doesn't.
Thanks to Naomiatt & Uncle John for their imput.

Olde Crone Holden
12-11-10, 10:24
Alan

Sorry, I couldn't face lookiong for a William Watkins, lol!

OC

AlanC
12-11-10, 10:38
I did a search at your suggestion OC and very quickly gave up...............dozens of them.

Inahaystack
13-11-10, 18:24
Collins Dictionary has spital listed as :-
spital [ˈspɪtəl]n Obsolete1. (Medicine) a hospital, esp for the needy sick
2. a highway shelter[C13 spitel, changed from Medieval Latin hospitāle hospital]


Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/_/misc/HarperCollinsProducts.aspx?English) © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

margaretmarch
13-11-10, 18:44
Could it be something to do with 'spit' roasting? Is spit short for spital which would be say for a hog roast
Margaret

Janet in Yorkshire
13-11-10, 20:20
Could it be a spurtle turner?
I don't make porridge, but I do have a spurtle, which I use for stirring other things. The wood would have to be shaped and turned to get the correct shape.

Jay

AlanC
13-11-10, 23:00
I like the idea of a Medical reference and Margarets Spit roasting appeals to me. Some Historian will know and until he or she comes forward, we can only speculate. I actually lived in a place called 'Spital' on the Wirral which is only a couple of miles from a big Oncology Hospital.
Janet, the writing is very clear but as mentioned earlier, it could have been transcribed incorrectly.

Inahaystack
14-11-10, 00:15
Spurtle can be spelt 'spirtle'. Perhaps it is a spelling mistake - often happened

Janet in Yorkshire
14-11-10, 00:15
Janet, the writing is very clear but as mentioned earlier, it could have been transcribed incorrectly.

I wasn't questioning the writing, Alan - I said spital quickly and it made me think of spurtle! I wondered if it had been recorded as it sounded??????

Jay

don.t
14-11-10, 00:21
As you say Alan one can only speculate on what the meaning to this is however I wonder if the answer is more to do with the land rather than a hospital or hostel as in spitleman.
One meaning for Spittle is "a spade, small spade, hoe or scraper", whilst another meaning for the word Spittle gives it as "to dig in, to pare etc with a spittle". Keeping in mind that the depth of a spade thrust into the earth is called a spit could the meaning of the phrase "Spitle turner" be connected to someone working with a spade and "turning" the earth over?

Olde Crone Holden
14-11-10, 10:05
Isn't "spurtle" a Scottish word?

OC

Chrissie Smiff
14-11-10, 12:03
No help but - does anyone know what a Railman in a Forge is?

After checking for likely Sarah A Watkins births I noticed that many were in Wales. So after checking England in 1861 I check Wales and apart from several Farmers I came across a William Watkins as a Railman in a Forge. After it in brackets is something like I or T ?

http://search.ancestry.co.uk/iexec/?htx=view&r=5538&dbid=8768&iid=BRERG9_4214_4221-0994&fn=Sarah&ln=Watkins&st=r&ssrc=&pid=15281690

Inahaystack
14-11-10, 16:23
No help but - does anyone know what a Railman in a Forge is?

After checking for likely Sarah A Watkins births I noticed that many were in Wales. So after checking England in 1861 I check Wales and apart from several Farmers I came across a William Watkins as a Railman in a Forge. After it in brackets is something like I or T ?

http://search.ancestry.co.uk/iexec/?htx=view&r=5538&dbid=8768&iid=BRERG9_4214_4221-0994&fn=Sarah&ln=Watkins&st=r&ssrc=&pid=15281690


Found this on RootsWebChat :-

From: Roger Kelly <rmj4@ix.net.au>
To: <MONMOUTHSHIRE-L@rootsweb.com>
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2001 2:44 AM
Subject: [Mon] Railman in Iron Works


> Hi Listers,
>
> Thanks to all who replied, hope I have replied to all directly, I
appreciate the
> advise to get "A History of Ebbw Vale" by Arthur Gray-Jones - such local
knowledge is
> great for new comers from remote Australia. It seems consensus is
"Railman in Iron
> Works" is a skilled progression from "forge labourer" where they used
their
> blacksmithing skills to cast or asses quality of rails for railways around
the world.

AlanC
14-11-10, 17:59
So many perfectly reasonable explanations for which I thank you.

Bee
16-11-10, 00:57
Just a late thought about the original question - could it have been 'spindal' turner? (Misspelling of 'spindle'?) Either a spindle for wool or cotton spinning, or for stairs. The 'nd' could perhaps be read as a 't'?

BTW, there's a village called Spittal in Pembrokeshire - no hospital very close these days, but may have been a 'travellers refuge', as it's just off the main route to St David's.

Bee.

Tippin
17-11-10, 14:11
I don't know if you ever managed to find what a Spital Turner is, but I do have at least one reference to a Spittall Tree Turner. Not quite my family so I have never looked into it, but thought I would pass it on as there seems to be some doubt as to whever Spital is the correct word.

Look for Giles Worton, 2nd House down. (http://search.ancestry.co.uk/browse/view.aspx?dbid=7619&iid=SALRG10_2731_2735-0289&pid=6470716&ssrc=&fn=Giles&ln=Worton&st=g)

Tippin