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GallowayLass
14-06-19, 00:31
I have a death on board the ‘Maori King’ 16 August 1900. I can’t find where that ship was sailing from and to but there are co-ordinates for where the death took place. The image is not very good and the best I can guess is Latitude 9 8 West and Longitude 138 48 East. Also the ship was registered in London and her trade is listed as ‘C’. There are other codes such as CL, NA and NP but no legend to decode these.

Can any tell me where in the world those co-ordinates are and what ‘C’ means?

Also the death on ScotlandsPeople Marine Returns shows the deceased’s occupation as cattleman which matches what’s on the above document in Deaths at Sea 1891-1972 document BT 334 Box 0024 Page 21. However, the SP Marine Return also has in the last column that he was a member of the crew. The first entry in the page says “crew” and every entry below that has ditto marks. Was it common for people to work for their passage?

Many thanks.

GallowayLass
14-06-19, 01:00
UPDATE that might be 9.8 North rather than West - it's hard to tell if the letter is N or W. Probably N as that makes more sense, sorry for the confusion.

Jill on the A272
14-06-19, 06:30
Lloyds List newspaper has this entry on 20 Aug 1900 page 9, 6th column

MELBOURNE...arrived
Maori King (s) [16 Aug]
Norfolk (s)

jenoco
14-06-19, 06:42
I think the coordinates you've given are for a location off of Papua New Guinea. From Wikipedia I found this link to the Arafura Sea, which is longitude 5.29 degrees S and 138 E so it must be a bit north of the place shown.
https://tools.wmflabs.org/geohack/geohack.php?pagename=138th_meridian_east&params=5_29_S_138_0_E_type:waterbody&title=Arafura+Sea
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/138th_meridian_east

I can't answer the other questions, but perhaps the C meant it was a commercial ship?

GallowayLass
14-06-19, 08:19
Thank you Jill. So he was travelling outbound from UK.

GallowayLass
14-06-19, 08:20
Thank you Jenoco. That would certainly make sense of him dying of heat apoplexy.

GallowayLass
14-06-19, 08:24
I have found an entry in the Commons section of Wikipedia. ‘Maori King’ was a refrigerated cargo ship so maybe ‘C’ stands for cargo. She seems to have worked in the areas around the coordinates. Here’s the two screenshots.

20123
20124

Macbev
14-06-19, 18:25
Trove has articles about the Maori King indicating the steamship was used to transport Australian troops to South Africa during July 1900 to engage in the Boer War. August articles refer to shipment of cattle from Australia to China

GallowayLass
14-06-19, 23:48
He must have been on its voyage into Australia just before the July troops to South Africa journey. Interesting that the one after that was carrying cattle. Maybe the one my man was on was the same given he was a cattleman on the documents which I know to be true.

MarkDurham
15-06-19, 12:14
The Latitude will be given as either North or South, the longitude either East or West.

If it's 9.8N (9deg 8min North), 138.48E (or 138deg 48min East) then it is about 28 miles off the north west coast of Yap Island.

If it's 9.8S (9deg 8min South), 138.48E (or 138deg 48min East) then it is in the Arafura Sea just off the coast of northern Australia near Wessel Marchinbar Island.

Hope that helps.

GallowayLass
15-06-19, 14:04
The Latitude will be given as either North or South, the longitude either East or West.

If it's 9.8N (9deg 8min North), 138.48E (or 138deg 48min East) then it is about 28 miles off the north west coast of Yap Island.

If it's 9.8S (9deg 8min South), 138.48E (or 138deg 48min East) then it is in the Arafura Sea just off the coast of northern Australia near Wessel Marchinbar Island.

Hope that helps.

Thank you very much Mark.

MarkDurham
15-06-19, 16:49
Oops, there's an error in what I wrote!

9.8N is not the same as 9deg 8minutes North! If 9.8N was meant to be interpreted as degrees by the reader, then it's 9deg 48min North. Same for the longitude: 138.48 East is 138deg 28.8min East.

It doesn't make that much difference when you are looking for a rough area on Google Earth. However, it makes a lot of difference if you are trying to pinpoint an exact spot.