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jood
19-05-16, 04:27
I am in Australia, and we recently found this.

http://i935.photobucket.com/albums/ad193/joody_anne/Probate%20A%20Goring.png

Upon enquiry it cost over 8 pounds for them just to access whether or not they can make a copy, then you pay the copying costs.

Would anyone know if there would be much personal information on it - is it a will? Is there a cheaper way of getting around to seeing what it is?

Jill on the A272
19-05-16, 06:38
It says it's an Administration so would just give the details to whom Administration had been granted.

jood
19-05-16, 07:01
Thanks Jill, so is there no other way to get it than to pay eight pounds which is about $16 plus copying?

brentor boy
19-05-16, 08:52
Letters of Administration are granted when there is NO will. The applicant is authorised/obliged to distribute the estate in accordance with legal criteria. You are unlikely to get anything more than the name of the applicant for your money.

Chrissie Smiff
19-05-16, 08:58
This page will explain how we would send for a Probate (and will if there was one) Jood. Strangely though when I looked in 1780 for a Garringe it said there were no results. It costs us £10 and that's for the will if there is one and if not just the probate.

https://www.gov.uk/wills-probate-inheritance/searching-for-probate-records

JudithM
19-05-16, 09:03
This page will explain how we would send for a Probate (and will if there was one) Jood. Strangely though when I looked in 1780 for a Garringe it said there were no results. It costs us £10 and that's for the will if there is one and if not just the probate.

https://www.gov.uk/wills-probate-inheritance/searching-for-probate-records

The link you have given Chrissie is for the national probate index which started in 1858. Jood has found an entry on the Middlesex archdeaconry court, one of the church courts where wills were proved prior to 1858.

Chrissie Smiff
19-05-16, 09:36
Sorry, yes I should have checked. I had Googled for 1780 but didn't realise I had posted the wrong link.

jood
19-05-16, 12:56
If it helps, their name is actually GORRINGE, we've only just discovered this one under GARRANGE

Sue1
20-05-16, 13:37
I thought we could get wills info and probate online for nothing - I am sure I have in the past from the Wills Calendar - it has been a long time since I did it and maybe it no longer is available. I have never sent for the original Will because I have never needed it - the info available is who the beneficiary is (usually only one), the address and date of death and sometimes the cause of death. The name of the person applying for Probate and to whom Probate is awarded is given.
I imagine you would have to send and pay for Will if you wanted detailed info of bequests and to whom they were made.

Sue

PhotoFamily
20-05-16, 14:57
If you have a family history centre near you, you could request the film to come to you from familysearch's catalog:
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/41422?availability=Family%20History%20Library
Nominal fee applies.

From what I can tell, you're man is too early for Death Duty Registers.

London Wills and Probate (but not admon) are on Ancestry:
http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1704

jood
21-05-16, 02:16
Thanks for your replies Sue and PhotoFamily :)

margaretmarch
26-05-16, 15:13
If you have a family history centre near you, you could request the film to come to you from familysearch's catalog:
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/41422?availability=Family%20History%20Library
Nominal fee applies.

From what I can tell, you're man is too early for Death Duty Registers.

London Wills and Probate (but not admon) are on Ancestry:
http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1704

You can see the Probate Register here https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/#wills - for free but seing any more details costs £10. You buy on line and they are issued on line.

Margaret

Anne in Carlisle
26-05-16, 22:30
Yes, but the OP was asking about a will in 1780. The Gov. site is for after 1858.
Anne

Janet in Yorkshire
27-05-16, 09:24
Yes, but the OP was asking about a will in 1780. The Gov. site is for after 1858.
Anne

Agree with Anne.
Pre-1858 wills were proved in a whole range of church courts and there is no centralisation. Most are held by relevant county or church archives, not all have been indexed and even less are available on line. The alternative to paying a fee for a copy of a transcription or an abstract is to employ a local genealogist or visit in person - however although the access to the document is "free," a personal visit usually works out as the much more expensive option, when considering the cost of travel, time involved and possibly overnight accommodation too.

Of course, it's always a gamble as to how much information you will glean.

Jay