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GrandmaSilver
04-04-15, 16:23
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GrandmaSilver
04-04-15, 16:27
Found these in the back of the garage and started researching who this person was in my husbands family. Found a war record stating that he was 17 years and 217 days old when he enlisted. Can anyone work out when his birthday was if he enlisted on 9 Sep 1916? Also what are the medals please.


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JudithM
04-04-15, 16:45
Found these in the back of the garage and started researching who this person was in my husbands family. Found a war record stating that he was 17 years and 217 days old when he enlisted. Can anyone work out when his birthday was if he enlisted on 9 Sep 1916? Also what are the medals please.


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I think his 17th birthday would have been on 4th February 1916, definitely born some time in early February 1899

JudithM
04-04-15, 16:48
The two medals on ribbons are the British War Medal and the Victory medal

JudithM
04-04-15, 16:53
The one mounted between the others is a memorial plaque presented to next of kin of men who died in WW1 http://www.greatwar.co.uk/memorials/memorial-plaque.htm

GrandmaSilver
04-04-15, 16:55
Thank you for your help Judith.. Do you know which is the war medal and which is the victory medal?


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JudithM
04-04-15, 16:57
The British War medal is on the left, Victory on the right. :)

GrandmaSilver
04-04-15, 17:02
Thank you.


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GrandmaSilver
04-04-15, 18:25
Does anyone know what being qualified in bombing would have meant in WW1?

DoctorGeoff
08-04-15, 12:42
Could be what we now call Land-mines.
The practice was to bury large amounts of explosive. that could be detonated from a single switch.
Look up the battle of Messines Ridge to see the biggest use.
But:
Small bombs thrown by hand are Grenades.
The tank crews even to day talk of a "full bomb load" when they mean shells for the main gun.
Geoff

GrandmaSilver
08-04-15, 17:12
Thanks. Sounds a very dangerous job and could be how he died.

grumpy
18-04-15, 00:48
Qualified in bombing means being taught all aspects of throwing/safe handling of hand grenades, on the British side refers to Mills bombs. Only a select number of men

per unit were qualified for this activity.

GrandmaSilver
20-04-15, 13:50
Thank you. That's very interesting.

James18
20-12-15, 01:26
What are the names on the medals? The photos are very small. Unlike WW2 medals, which were minted en masse without names, WW1 medals had names and individual serial numbers for the soldiers in question.

I've been trying to find 'death pennies' for a couple of my grandfather's brothers, but sadly to no avail so far.