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Vonny North West
06-05-13, 14:38
The 25th Manchester Regiment was a reserve force set up, from what I have read, in 1915 and disbanded is 1918. My elderly aunt insists that her father served in WW1 and suffered from shrapnel wounds. I eventually found the regiment he was in and his number, this was discovered on a deceased Aunt's birth certificate. In column 6 on the birth certificate, dated 1918, is the father's occupation. Here it lists Private, 25th Manchester regiment, 26412, in brackets, labourer in iron works. Now I have tried to find on the military sites a record but to no avail.
Does anyone know if any records exist or in fact if the said regiment actually went overseas at anytime during WW1?

Vonny.

margaretmarch
06-05-13, 14:42
The 25th Manchester Regiment was a reserve force set up, from what I have read, in 1915 and disbanded is 1918. My elderly aunt insists that her father served in WW1 and suffered from shrapnel wounds. I eventually found the regiment he was in and his number, this was discovered on a deceased Aunt's birth certificate. In column 6 on the birth certificate, dated 1918, is the father's occupation. Here it lists Private, 25th Manchester regiment, 26412, in brackets, labourer in iron works. Now I have tried to find on the military sites a record but to no avail.
Does anyone know if any records exist or in fact if the said regiment actually went overseas at anytime during WW1?

Vonny.

Ancestry and FindmyPast have WWI records - or at least those that have survived being bombed in WWII.

If you want to post up his name we can have a look for you.

Margaret

Vonny North West
06-05-13, 15:08
Thanks Margaret, his name is Richard Morris b.1884. I have already looked on FindmyPast, also Forces War Records
https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/Search The difficulty I seem to be having is that this was a reserve regiment, similar to "Dads Army" in WW2 and perhaps full service records were not kept. I have also looked in the National Roll of The Great War for Manchester published in 1920 and there isn't a listing for him. I don't have a subcription for Ancestry. My only other thought was to try the National Archives to see if anything on reserve forces has been kept there.

Vonny.

SmallTownGirl
06-05-13, 15:10
Here's a bit about the Regiment

http://www.1914-1918.net/mancs.htm

margaretmarch
06-05-13, 15:41
Thanks Margaret, his name is Richard Morris b.1884. I have already looked on FindmyPast, also Forces War Records
https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/Search The difficulty I seem to be having is that this was a reserve regiment, similar to "Dads Army" in WW2 and perhaps full service records were not kept. I have also looked in the National Roll of The Great War for Manchester published in 1920 and there isn't a listing for him. I don't have a subcription for Ancestry. My only other thought was to try the National Archives to see if anything on reserve forces has been kept there.

Vonny.

Nothing coming up on ancestry for him. I would try the national archives just in case.

Margaret

Vonny North West
06-05-13, 15:45
Thanks, I have read through this before.
Vonny.

AntonyM
06-05-13, 15:58
There is a Medal Roll Index card for him viewable on Ancestry - showing the Manchester Regt (26412) and the Labour Corps (277290). It shows he was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal which would imply that he must have served overseas at some point.

Vonny North West
06-05-13, 16:48
There is a Medal Roll Index card for him viewable on Ancestry - showing the Manchester Regt (26412) and the Labour Corps (277290). It shows he was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal which would imply that he must have served overseas at some point.
Many thanks for that information. Do you know if Find my Past would have the Medal Roll Index on there? I subscibe to that but not Ancestry.
Vonny.

AntonyM
07-05-13, 14:11
The Medal Roll index cards are not on FMP - however, the only other information on the card is the actual reference to the Medal Roll itself (LC/101B96 p9732) - you can use this to look up the entry in the roll book, and that should then give the battalion he was in. Just because he was in the 25th in 1918, it doesn't mean he spent the whole war in that battalion - men did get transferred. He may have been in another battalion, served overseas, been wounded and then moved into the 25th whilst he recovered, and then to the Labour Corps if he was unfit for further front line service.

The medal rolls themselves are not on line, and you need to physically look them up at The National Archives at Kew, or get someone to do it for you.

It does appear though that the medal roll reference is for the Labour Corps, so may not mention his service in the Manchester Regiment.

garstonite
07-05-13, 22:40
Didn`t The Labour Corps dig the trenches on the front Line ?? so right in the thick of it !!!...I seem to remember a film about The Maginot Line in WW1 all about the Labour Corps and their bravery .....going to google that now out of curiousity ...
ADDED....sincere apologies - that was WW2 ....SENILE DEMENTIA ....LOL...SHOWING MY AGE - forgetting things :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

grumpy
07-05-13, 23:06
The labour corps were formed in early 1917 and grew to a force of nearly 400,000 men. By the time of the armistice around 225,000 of the men were working overseas

in various theatres of war. The corps consisted of officers and men who were medically rated below A1, a requirement of front line service, many of them being returned

wounded from other service. They were often working in range of gun fire so thoroughly deserved their medals. Because of a shortage of men about 50,000 men from

China were imported to also work in the field.

Apparently few records remain of the day to day activities of the labour force.

A detailed description of the labour forces can found on the web site associated with the Great War forum (the long long trail).

Vonny North West
08-05-13, 10:06
The Medal Roll index cards are not on FMP - however, the only other information on the card is the actual reference to the Medal Roll itself (LC/101B96 p9732) - you can use this to look up the entry in the roll book, and that should then give the battalion he was in. Just because he was in the 25th in 1918, it doesn't mean he spent the whole war in that battalion - men did get transferred. He may have been in another battalion, served overseas, been wounded and then moved into the 25th whilst he recovered, and then to the Labour Corps if he was unfit for further front line service.

The medal rolls themselves are not on line, and you need to physically look them up at The National Archives at Kew, or get someone to do it for you.

It does appear though that the medal roll reference is for the Labour Corps, so may not mention his service in the Manchester Regiment.

Thanks for that information, I have now downloaded from the National Archives website, his medal card. All it proves is that he was actually in France during 1915. I know from his neices wedding certificate that he was at her wedding in August 1916 as he was a witness! I have checked out the medals he would have been awarded and they would have been The British War Medal 1914-1918, and the Allied Victory Medal. http://www.greatwar.co.uk/medals/ww1-campaign-medals.htm I have also found reference to the Labour Corps wich do contain some really good pictures http://www.1914-1918.net/labour.htm This part of my research is now complete. I wouldn't have been able to put to rest my elderly Aunt's questions about her father. I couldn't have done it without the help and support of Family Forum, so many thanks.
Vonny.

Vonny North West
08-05-13, 10:09
Didn`t The Labour Corps dig the trenches on the front Line ?? so right in the thick of it !!!...I seem to remember a film about The Maginot Line in WW1 all about the Labour Corps and their bravery .....going to google that now out of curiousity ...
ADDED....sincere apologies - that was WW2 ....SENILE DEMENTIA ....LOL...SHOWING MY AGE - forgetting things :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

I have found reference to the Labour Corps, it is really an intersting read, http://www.1914-1918.net/labour.htm
Vonny

Vonny North West
08-05-13, 10:11
The labour corps were formed in early 1917 and grew to a force of nearly 400,000 men. By the time of the armistice around 225,000 of the men were working overseas

in various theatres of war. The corps consisted of officers and men who were medically rated below A1, a requirement of front line service, many of them being returned

wounded from other service. They were often working in range of gun fire so thoroughly deserved their medals. Because of a shortage of men about 50,000 men from

China were imported to also work in the field.

Apparently few records remain of the day to day activities of the labour force.

A detailed description of the labour forces can found on the web site associated with the Great War forum (the long long trail).

I have found reference on this website for The Labour Corps http://www.1914-1918.net/labour.htm
Vonny